woodpecker

Piliated woodpeckers

Piliated woodpeckers

Click through to Flickr to play this video. I’ll try to embed a copy at some point.

A pair of pileated woodpeckers working on a stump next to our house.

Note: My sister-in-law thinks it’s probably a male-female pair and I now agree. I didn’t see enough difference between them and didn’t know the female had as much red on her head. So, my narration is probably off.

I heard a pileated call that seemed closer then usual, looked out my office window and this is what I saw. Grabbed my iPhone and recorded this through a window. Clipped the initial futzing around and zooming in.

These magnificent birds are very shy. We hear them in the tree-tops behind our house but never see them this close. It’s not unusual for them to work on trees at ground level though; more insects there.

In walking around our place I found three more stumps with recent pileated wood-pecking on them, hopefully they’ll come back.

Yellow-bellied sapsucker holes in basswood tree

Dave shooting yellow-bellied sapsucker holes in basswood tree

Macedonia Brook State Park, Kent, Connecticut. Dave and I were hiking the other day and I spotted some unusual bark on a tree. On closer inspection the bark was riddled with woodpecker holes up and down the entire tree.

The bird is a yellow-bellied sapsucker and it really likes this tree. As you’ll see in the other pictures, the entire tree is riddled with holes, bottom to top.

Dave thought this tree was close to 100 years old so this is many generations of sapsucker action on it. No other trees in the area showed this kind of woodpecker damage except two other basswood trees a few hundred feet away.

As you’ll see in the last image the tree is still living, amazingly after such a riddling with holes.

Yellow-bellied sapsucker holes in basswood tree

Yellow-bellied sapsucker holes in basswood tree

Yellow-bellied sapsucker holes in basswood tree