volcano

Kilauea eruption aerial footage

May 19, 2018 Pele's March to the Pacific Local News from Mick Kalber on Vimeo.

Mick Kalber has a number of amazing aerial videos of the Kilauea Volcano eruption on the big island of Hawaii. This is remarkable footage shot from a helicopter on May 19th.

“An unbelievable amount of lava is erupting from fissures below Leilani Estates on the Big Island of Hawaii! More than twenty cracks are issuing red hot liquid rock, which is coursing downhill, destroying homes, cars, roads… and anything else in her path. The fissures have now joined forming a “curtain of fire” in a spectacular display. Numerous fingers of lava have stretched toward the sea overnight, and this morning were only about a mile from the water. Over forty homes have been destroyed since the eruption began fifteen days ago. Although it began in Leilani and burned several homes there, she soon established her vents below the subdivision with towering fountains, spatter cones feeding gigantic lava flows. So far, no deaths have been reported. First responders have evacuated several residents who had become trapped by the fast moving flows. Pohoiki Road has been covered with lava, but Highways 132 and 137 are still open as of this writing. If she continues at the same rate we saw this morning, she may cross the “Red Road,” and make the ocean by tonight or tomorrow. No lava is currently erupting in the Leilani Estates subdivision. Mahalo to the kind folks at Paradise Helicopters… they offer the finest charters in the islands!”

[via Colossal]

Reuters retracts Icelandic volcano photo

Reuters Retracts Icelandic Volcano Photo

This is a fascinating story. This is the comment I made in the thread at PetaPixel:

I think most of us can agree that a DSLR is doing some processing before the image gets written to the card and how a photographer sets things up will determine how little or much is done. There is no “turn off all in-camera processing” as all DSLRs process the image that coms off the sensor in some way, even RAW files.

Maybe pointing the finger at processing or post processing is a mistake, let’s just let photo editors decide what they want and leave it at that. If they want a more conservative look or they want an amped up look, that’s their decision.

As photographers we know that even if we attempt to take and process images that, to the best of our ability channel reality, we all have different eyes and a different sense of what “real” is so it’s subjective all the way down.

As is said above, Ansel Adams put a red filter on to make Half Dome look more dramatic, and it worked. As one who’s spent a lot of time both in front of and on Half Dome, I can assure you that while I love the Adams image, it’s not the way Half Dome looks to most if not all human eyes. Again, great image, but a Reuters photo editor might rightly reject it.

This remains a fascinating topic that has been “discussed” for years and will continue to be discussed for many years to come.