trees

Field and trees in light snow

Tire tracks with snow

Tire tracks with snow

Cornwall Bridge, Connecticut.

Two weeks later, I found myself on the same field as my last post with the same hiking partner. This time there had been a light snow and some tire tracks made a nice tracking line toward the odd looking trees at the south end of the field.

The Appalachian Trail runs along the left edge this frame and the Housatonic River is a bit further left.

Tree menagerie

Tree menagerie

These trees form a wind block between two hay fields and every time I hike past them I admire their odd shapes.

Trees in fog on the Appalachian Trail

Trees in fog on the Appalachian Trail

Cornwall Bridge, Connecticut.

Tom and I hiked south from Cornwall Bridge toward Kent on the AT and early on we passed four hay fields, each with end borders comprised of oddly shaped trees. Between the light on the field, the trees, and the fog, I had to stop and attempt a few shots. It ended up being tougher than I thought to get both the fog and the detail in the trees.

Forest near Thayer Brook

Forest near Thayer Brook

Appalachian Trail south of Kent, Connecticut.

I don’t often shoot straight into a dense forest but this scene had so much going on I thought I’d give it a try.

This is the forest right near Thayer Brook which the Appalachian Trail crosses south of Rt. 341 and Kent, Connecticut. Many times this place (it also has large tulip trees that I like to photograph) is my final destination but this day I continued down to Bull’s Bridge, hiking the entire eight miles of Schaghticoke Ridge which is a tough hike.

Given that my truck was up at the start of my hike on Rt. 341 and I was on my own, I had to text my wife to pick me up and drive me back to my truck. Good thing she was home and available, otherwise it would have been a long day.

Pine grove

Pine grove

West of Great Barrington, Massachusetts on the Appalachian Trail.

We took a hike from Rt. 23 to the Housatonic River on the AT to inspect some trail work that’s been done in the past year. At the very end of the hike is this pine grove. Even though it was no doubt planted by hand (the trees are in rows) the light in groves like this makes them extremely photogenic. I almost always stop to take a picture of a grove like this, either across or up.

Trees on Schaghticoke Ridge

Two oaks on Schaghticoke Ridge

Two oak trees

Schaghticoke Ridge, Appalachian Trial, Kent, Connecticut. The section of the Appalachian Trail between Bull’s Bridge and Rt. 341/Kent is called Schaghticoke Ridge because it goes over Schaghticoke Mountain and skirts the Schaghticoke indian reservation down on the Housatonic River. It’s actually the section of AT that’s closest to my house in Warren; it’s about 20 minutes away. When I’m not hiking the entire ridge (8 miles, two cars) I like to hike in from one end or the other and then double back.

Each end has nice features and the north end, which I did today has some very nice trees including a small grove of large tulip trees that I’ve photographed a lot over the years.

I keep a journal of my hikes and one of the things that I’ve been recording over the years are good photo ops on various hikes. It never changes the gear I take (one small camera) but, for example, I enjoy doing certain hikes along certain ridges with a lot of mountain laurel in late June, early July because the mountain laurel is in bloom then. All of that said, pretty much any hike I do during fall is going to be interesting because of the color change but also because the light is different in fall. Of course, winter is coming and there will be ice… Okay, okay, there’s always something to shoot on a hike, it’s (me) the photographer who has to be ready to do the shooting.

Two tulips on Schaghticoke Ridge

Two tulip trees

Tulip trees from below

Tulip trees

Kent, Connecticut. This is a repeat of a group of trees I’ve photographed a lot as they’re quite spectacular.

Hiking south along the Appalachian trail on Schaghticoke Ridge we crossed Thayer Brook where we came upon a small grove of large tulip trees. One tree has three trunks, the other two.

Some of these images were taken with a new Sony RX100 II, some were taken with a Ricoh GR. In short, the Sony’s articulated LCD is wonderful for these kinds of shots but the Ricoh’s ergonomics and speed are second to none. Both cameras have their strengths and weaknesses which are overlapping so I thought it would be good to carry both.

Tulip trees

Tulip trees

Tulip trees

Tulip trees

This last one was taken with the Ricoh GR, the rest were taken with the Sony RX100 II.