software

SuperPaint

SuperPaint (front of box)

I was cleaning out a box of old boxes (I love boxes) and found this product box from 1986.

Those of us who started with MacPaint eventually graduated to other tools. I was a MacDraw fanatic (object-oriented graphics) but still needed a bit-mapped painting program (this was pre-Photoshop). SuperPaint was what many of us used and it was like MacPaint on steroids.

If you remember, “FatBits” was MacPaint’s zoomed mode, “LaserBits” was something similar with SuperPaint (as memory serves). SuperPaint had all sorts of creative touches that were great fun for those of us who enjoyed MacPaint.

I’m posting two images, one of the front of the box, one of the back. If this history interests you, read the back to see more about what graphics programs looked like pre-Photoshop.

SuperPaint (back of box)

Craig Hickman

The Macintosh computer is 30 years old today and Apple has some great images and stories up at their web site commemorating this birthday: Macintosh at 30.

My old friend and colleague Craig Hickman who’s a professor in the digital arts program at the University of Oregon (where I taught) and wrote the popular program Kid Pix, was featured today on the Apple web site as an important contributor to the Macintosh’s evolution.

Making art kid-friendly

Kid Pix was and remains incredible, but Craig wrote lots of software including an amazing virtual camera that ran on the 128K Mac. Here’s Craig’s online version of Virtual Camera.

For more on the evolution of Kid Pix check out: Kid Pix – The Early Years.

Congratulations Craig.