snowshoeing

Ice and tree patterns

Ice on the Appalachian Trail

On the Appalachian Trail between Hubbard Brook and Rt. 7 near Sheffield, Massachusetts.

Great snowshoeing on the AT through a great section of southern Mass. Many small stream crossings, all frozen and snow-covered so very little ice. This patch was at the bottom of a deep well of snow so I had to contort myself to get in close. A zoom lens would have been nice.

I took a number of shots with both the Ricoh GR and the Sony RX100 II, all of this same pattern, all at the same distance. I processed them all the same way and culled them down to the best Ricoh and the best Sony. Then I used Lightroom’s X/Y comparison tool to look closely and while this is not a scientific study or comparison, the Ricoh image had quite a bit more detail. Naturally, it has a larger sensor but it has less resolution so I figure it’s close to a wash. None of the images was perfect but this one was the best of the lot.

Pine grove looking up

This is a great pine grove that’s fun to shoot so I gave it another go with the Ricoh GR and liked the results in high contrast JPEG but after processing the RAW decided I liked the detail in it better.

Mt. Race, south ridge (again)

Mt. Race, South Ridge (again)

Southwest Massachusetts.

Dave, Cathy, Nora and I snowshoed up onto Mt. Race, the same hike we did last week (sans snowshoes). We had over a foot of new snow since and the going was tough. Cathy led and broke trail the entire way (thank god).

This is looking south down the Appalachian Trail toward the Connecticut border and Bear Mountain (just off frame to the right). You can just sort of make out Twin Lakes and Salisbury, Connecticut in the back-left of the frame.

Another fantastic day: great conditions, great company, great time.

Snowshoeing up Mt. Everett

Mt. Everett across Guilder Pond

Mt. Everett across Guilder Pond

Mt. Everett Reservation, Southwest Massachusetts. We had one good day of snow and snowshoeing before the current thaw hit and Dave and I snowshoed up Mt. Everett as our first snowshoe of the year. It was an incredible day: perfect snow, not too deep for unbroken snowshoeing (we broke the trail) and the light was amazing.

Mt. Everett used to have a fire tower on top and so, has an access road much of the way up which runs parallel to the Appalachian Trail. We snowshoed up the road as far as we could, then took the AT to the top.

This is a very nice hike to do any time of year (mountain laurel in July are killer good here), not very difficult but great landscape to photograph and enough of a hike to get one’s heart beating. The view on top is unremarkable and the last shot in this series is looking east through frozen trees to Twin Lakes near Salisbury, Connecticut.

As I post this it’s raining, warm, and almost all the snow is melted. While snow can be a pain at times (driving home from JFK the other day was a horror), a day of snowshoeing like this is one of the greatest forms of hiking there is.

My wish for the new year is many more days like this and wherever you are, I hope you have them too.

Guilder Pond

Guilder Pond

Guilder Pond

Guilder Pond

Frozen hemlock

Frozen hemlock

Going up Mt. Everett

Going up Mt. Everett

Frozen trees on Mt. Everett

Frozen trees on Mt. Everett

Frozen grass

Frozen grass

Frozen trees on Mt. Everett

Frozen trees on Mt. Everett

Dave breaking the path up Mt. Everett

Dave breaking the path up Mt. Everett

Dave near the top of Mt. Everett

Dave near the top of Mt. Everett

Frozen trees on Mt. Everett

Frozen trees on Mt. Everett

View from top of Mt. Everett

View from the top of Mt. Everett

Snow and trees reflected in Guilder Pond

Snow and trees reflected in Guilder Pond

Mt. Everett Reservation, Massachusetts. On the way up to Mt. Everett on snowshoes we stopped and took a few shots of Guilder Pond. We snowshoed around it and got some more nice images but this one was the best I got that day.

I continue to be both frustrated and amazed with the Sony RX100: It’s a pain to use but the images it makes are spectacular. I solved the cold hands on metal body problem I was having with a pair of very thin neoprene gloves. Amazingly they seem to work okay on the RX100’s tiny controls and shutter button.

Every time I want to return this camera or sell it I look at the images and change my mind. Be patient Richard… Sigh.