snow

Ice, grass, snow

Ice, grass, snow

Macricostas Preserve, Washington, Connecticut.

Tom and I took a quick walk around an old corn field and there were a few spots that were frozen enough to show interest. The snow was very light so we could see through to the grass and the ice, grass, and snow made a great pattern.

I had to crop this to get some leaves out of it that I thought might be interesting but in the end, weren’t.

Clouds, snow and shadows

Cirrus clouds on the AT

Cirrus clouds on the AT

Cornwall Bridge, Connecticut.

We took a hike south on the Appalachian Trail along the Housatonic River and as we got out onto a big field this amazing clouds blew into view above the ridge to the west. I took ten shots and the clouds were moving so fast that each was completely different.

We hiked all the way down to Kent and then turned around and came back. A few hours later, there wasn’t a cloud in the sky.

Spring-like melt

Spring-like melt

Out in the middle of a big field there were still patches of snow on top of the grass but they were melting fast. This seems very odd for the end of February; last year at the same time we were snowshoeing on this field.

Low light scarecrows

Low light scarecrows

By the time we returned the sun was very low making for some great shadows, including our own. The Ricoh GR is in my right hand.

Field and trees in light snow

Tire tracks with snow

Tire tracks with snow

Cornwall Bridge, Connecticut.

Two weeks later, I found myself on the same field as my last post with the same hiking partner. This time there had been a light snow and some tire tracks made a nice tracking line toward the odd looking trees at the south end of the field.

The Appalachian Trail runs along the left edge this frame and the Housatonic River is a bit further left.

Tree menagerie

Tree menagerie

These trees form a wind block between two hay fields and every time I hike past them I admire their odd shapes.

Ice at low angle

Ice at low angle

Appalachian Trail, south end of Schaghticoke Ridge.

Nora and I used micro-spikes to hike three miles up the south end of the ridge to a small stream I’ve photographed ice on before, hoping to get a few ice shots this year. The hike was great although we had to push it because of the incoming snow storm. And, the stream did not disappoint; it was loaded with ice formations and I took over 100 shots which will take a while to sort through.

This one was an experiment: instead of shooting straight down at the ice pattern I placed the camera very close to the ice and shot at low angle toward the water. I like the effect.

Beech on snow

Beech on snow

Appalachian Trail, Kent, Connecticut.

There are a few beech trees next to Thayer Brook and they tend to hold at least some of their dried leaves all winter. When those leaves fall on the snow they look quite nice and while it might have been interesting to leave the light tan color in this, I liked how the leaf looked in monochrome with the reflective snow, almost translucent.

The tree that probably dropped this leaf is big enough so bears climb it for nuts in season. We call trees with bear claw marks on them “bear trees” and always inspect any beeches we see near the trail for bear claw marks. Of course, always good to look up to make sure the bear isn’t still up there.