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MacPaint print

MacPaint print

I had one of the first 128K Macintosh computers in Eugene, Oregon and while I did a lot of writing with MacWrite, I also did a lot of “drawing” with MacPaint.

MacPaint was written by Bill Atkinson (one of the core members of the original Macintosh team at Apple) who added lots of fun touches to all of his early software. MacPaint had various distortions and to be honest, I can’t remember which one was responsible for this image (maybe “invert” and/or “trace edges”). I didn’t draw this; instead I drew some random shapes and chose what would now be called a “filter” and this was the result. It delighted me to no end and I made hundreds of these which I printed on my ImageWriter dot matrix printer.

I’m posting this now because I’m cleaning our basement and found boxes and boxes of old Macintosh related keepsakes, including some of my old writing and drawing done on my first Mac (not my first computer but close).

I had to run upstairs and pop an antihistamine; between dust and mold it was like an archeological dig.

SuperPaint

SuperPaint (front of box)

I was cleaning out a box of old boxes (I love boxes) and found this product box from 1986.

Those of us who started with MacPaint eventually graduated to other tools. I was a MacDraw fanatic (object-oriented graphics) but still needed a bit-mapped painting program (this was pre-Photoshop). SuperPaint was what many of us used and it was like MacPaint on steroids.

If you remember, “FatBits” was MacPaint’s zoomed mode, “LaserBits” was something similar with SuperPaint (as memory serves). SuperPaint had all sorts of creative touches that were great fun for those of us who enjoyed MacPaint.

I’m posting two images, one of the front of the box, one of the back. If this history interests you, read the back to see more about what graphics programs looked like pre-Photoshop.

SuperPaint (back of box)

Scanned postcards of early 20th Century America

These picture postcards capture the monumental scale of America in the early 20th century

Rian Dundon, editor at Timeline has put together a fantastic collection of scanned postcards of things like the Flatiron Building under construction in 1902 to a scene of Market Street in San Francisco after the earthquake in 1906. It’s an amazing collection.

I recommend zooming it out, the images are high resolution and scale up well.

City to City

City to City

I was cleaning out a box of old boxes (I love boxes) and found this product box from 1986.

City to City was a travel reference tool that was built with HyperCard and ran on Macintosh Plus computers.

The significance of this is that it was more easily browsed than an atlas or travel book because HyperCard had the capacity to build links connecting different types of information (before the world wide web).

Once the web took off tools like this faded away. But, in its day it was a useful tool for those of us who did a lot of travel (I did a lot of travel for Apple in those days).

I’m posting two images, one of the cover, one of the back. If this history interests you, read the back to see more about what the world looked like before the web, GPSs and iPhones.

City to City

PhotoScan

This is a brilliant marketing video and I’m going to give this application a try. I don’t always like Google’s design sense on things like this but this video caught my attention. Might even give Google Photos a try too as Apple’s Photos app is less than wonderful. I’m a Lightroom user so use it for most of my heavy lifting but for stuff like this, especially image that won’t need much retouching, this system will be great, well, at least worth a try.

Update: I’ve PhotoScanned a number of images, some of which looked like they might be tough. The app works beautifully. I’m not using Google Photos, I’m moving the scanned photos into Apple Photos and that too is working fine. This is certainly an improvement over using the iPhone camera alone to do this kind of work. I highly recommend folks give this app a try, it’s quite good.

[via The Loop]

Anne and bicycle

Anne and bicycle

1959, Evansville, Indiana.

My wife Anne Latham and her (blue) bicycle. She was 12 when this image was taken.

Anne’s sister Betsy was cleaning out a drawer and found this photograph and sent it to us. Anne hadn’t seen it or thought about it since it was taken. Amazing how an image can be a wormhole back to another place and time.

Anne, Margie and cousins

Anne, Margie and cousins

1952, Kewanna, Indiana.

My wife Anne (on the right) and her younger sister Margie (center) and cousins at their aunt’s house. Anne and Margie grew up in Evansville, Indiana but spent parts of summers at their aunt’s farm upstate.

Update: Left to right: Mary-Nell Masteller, Sally Masteller, Margie Latham, Barbara Masteller, Anne Latham.

For perspective, here’s a more recent picture of Anne, Margie, and siblings:

Latham siblings

Left to right: Mary (Latham) Weeks, Margie (Latham) Bosse, Buzz Latham, Betsy Latham, and Anne (Latham) Wanderman (my wife).

Frances at NYU

Frances at NYU

New York, 1934 (maybe).

My mother went to NYU (New York University) and I’m guessing this picture is from that time. Tough to tell for sure but it seems that way.

She was an English major and when she graduated she worked at various magazines and publishing houses as an editor. She wasn’t career driven although my guess is she did well at whatever she did.

I’ve been scanning old pictures for a photo album I’m making for my mother for her 100th birthday, coming up on May 26th.

My parents and me

My parents and me

I’m guessing this was taken in 1953 (I’m 2, my parents are 38). Walter, Frances, Richard. This was shot by a professional portrait studio in New York and printed on very nice rag paper. The texture on the paper makes a nice, soft print although makes it tougher to scan. I didn’t correct the color on this one; it was no doubt printed as a monochrome but I’m not sure if the sepia tinge is age or was in the original print.

I’ve been scanning old pictures for a photo album I’m making for my mother for her 100th birthday, coming up on May 26th.