Richard Meier

The Getty Center

Glass corner

The glass corner above is opaque, what you see in it is all reflection.

The Getty Center, Los Angeles, California.

I’ve been shooting architectural images of this Richard Meier masterpiece for ten years now and it never bores me. A few years ago I had a show of images like these and it went very well; Richard Meier told me in a letter he thinks my images capture the spirit of his buildings and that put the a wonderful grin on my face.

Much of the ten years of shooting was with a Canon 5D and either a Canon 24-70mm f/2.8 or a 16-35mm f/2.8 lens, a kit that can get heavy when walking around a space like this for a few hours. Last year I walked through the Getty Center with a Sony RX100 and it was a revelation: the images it produced were excellent and in many ways rivaled the DSLR kit. Obviously some of this is me learning how to shoot these buildings and learning how to process the images in Lightroom but some of it is the sensor and lens combinations used to record the images.

So, today I decided to try the Ricoh GR to make many of the same images and it did not disappoint. There’s plenty of detail, metering was fine with a white facade, a dark blue sky with white clouds on a very bright sunny day and even with auto ISO on the camera stuck at ISO 100 and there was very little noise in the shadows. No noise reduction was needed for these images.

I have yet to get home and print these and for me, that’s the ultimate test but for the time being I could not be happier with this camera. The lack of an anti-aliasing filter didn’t seem to cause problems here as far as I can see although these shots may not be the best test of that feature/liability.

If you’ve not been to The Getty Center, it’s worth a trip to LA (a place I can’t stand) to visit; it’s truly a masterpiece.

Glass corner

The glass corner above is opaque, what you see in it is all reflection.

Curved exterior

Curved exterior

Narrow walkway

Exterior stairs

Entrance rotunda

Entrance rotunda

Getty Center staircase

Getty Center staircase

The Getty Center, Los Angeles, California. As some of you know I’ve been taking images of Richard Meier’s architecture at the Getty for over eight years now, almost all with a Canon 5D and a variety of high end zoom lenses. Today I had my Canon Powershot S100 and a rented Sony RX100 and I took a variety of images attempting to capture things similar to what I’d done with a DSLR. I must say, I was impressed with the way both cameras worked and while I’m not a big fan of Sony’s ergonomics, the image quality on this little RX100 is superb.

Compare this image to others in the set, I think you’ll be amazed at how well the point and shoot did.

Getty Center Impressions set

More Getty Center Abstractions

Getty Center Abstraction

This series of images was taken on visits to the Getty Center in Los Angeles, California over an eight year period.

I usually find this type of modern architecture sterile, but here the architect Richard Meier created spaces that are not only pleasant to be in but include interesting lines, windows, angles, curves, and textures in almost every view. Looking abstractly at these details reveals patterns that capture my eye as a photographer, and as many visual artists know, once you notice something like this, it’s hard to let go of it. I continue to visit the Getty and add to this collection.

Here’s the entire set so far: Getty Center Abstractions

I have a show of these images coming up next month. If you’re in the area stop by.

Getty Center Abstractions
Photographs by Richard Wanderman

Opening Saturday, January 7, 3:30 – 5:30 pm
Artist’s talk: 3:45 pm followed by reception

January 7 – April 14, 2012
Gallery Hours: Monday – Saturday, 10 am – 4 pm

Marie Louise Trichet Art Gallery
Wisdom House
229 East Litchfield Rd.
Litchfield, CT 06759
860-567-3163
www.wisdomhouse.org

Getty Center Abstraction

Getty Center Abstraction

Getty Center Abstraction

Getty Center Abstraction

Getty Center Abstraction

More Getty Center Abstractions

Getty Center Abstraction

This series of images was taken on visits to the Getty Center in Los Angeles, California over an eight year period.

I usually find this type of modern architecture sterile, but here the architect Richard Meier created spaces that are not only pleasant to be in but include interesting lines, windows, angles, curves, and textures in almost every view. Looking abstractly at these details reveals patterns that capture my eye as a photographer, and as many visual artists know, once you notice something like this, it’s hard to let go of it. I continue to visit the Getty and add to this collection.

Here’s the entire set so far: Getty Center Abstractions

Getty Center Abstraction

Getty Center Abstraction

Getty Center Abstraction

Getty Center Abstraction

More Getty Center Abstractions

Getty Center Abstraction

This series of images was taken on visits to the Getty Center in Los Angeles, California over an eight year period.

I usually find this type of modern architecture sterile, but here the architect Richard Meier created spaces that are not only pleasant to be in but include interesting lines, windows, angles, curves, and textures in almost every view. Looking abstractly at these details reveals patterns that capture my eye as a photographer, and as many visual artists know, once you notice something like this, it’s hard to let go of it. I continue to visit the Getty and add to this collection.

Here’s the entire set so far: Getty Center Abstractions

Getty Center Abstraction

Getty Center Abstraction

Getty Center Abstraction

More Getty Center Abstractions

Getty Center Abstraction

This series of images was taken on visits to the Getty Center in Los Angeles, California over an eight year period.

I usually find this type of modern architecture sterile, but here the architect Richard Meier created spaces that are not only pleasant to be in but include interesting lines, windows, angles, curves, and textures in almost every view. Looking abstractly at these details reveals patterns that capture my eye as a photographer, and as many visual artists know, once you notice something like this, it’s hard to let go of it. I continue to visit the Getty and add to this collection.

Here’s the entire set so far: Getty Center Abstractions

Getty Center Abstraction

Getty Center staircase

More Getty Center Abstractions

Getty Center Abstraction with wide angle

These images are part of a series taken on visits to the Getty Center in Los Angeles, California over an eight year period.

I’ve done all of my images in this series with a Canon 5D and a Canon 24-70mm f/2.8 L lens and I rented a Canon 16-35mm f/2.8 L lens to see how these images would work out with it and also to take a series of overview shots of larger areas of buildings. The image above was shot at 16mm with the 16-35, the image below was shot with the 24-70.

Getty Center abstraction

Getty Center Abstraction with wide angle 2

Getty Center Abstraction with wide angle

This image is part of a series taken on visits to the Getty Center in Los Angeles, California over an eight year period.

I’ve done all of my images in this series with a Canon 5D and a Canon 24-70mm f/2.8 L lens and I rented a Canon 16-35mm f/2.8 L lens to see how these images would work out with it and also to take a series of overview shots of larger areas of buildings.

What I learned is that a new lens with a wider angle of view will take some practice to get the most out of. My hit rate on the 200 images I took today was pretty low. Maybe best to just buy this lens as its been on my B&H wish list for about 4 years now.

Getty Center Abstraction with wide angle

Getty Center Abstraction with wide angle

This image is part of a series taken on visits to the Getty Center in Los Angeles, California over an eight year period.

I’ve done all of my images in this series with a Canon 5D and a Canon 24-70mm f/2.8 L lens and I rented a Canon 16-35mm f/2.8 L lens to see how these images would work out with it and also to take a series of overview shots of larger areas of buildings. This image was shot at 23mm so it’s pretty close to the wide end of the 24-70.

Getty Center Abstraction with wide angle

Getty Center Abstraction with wide angle

This image is part of a series taken on visits to the Getty Center in Los Angeles, California over an eight year period.

I’ve done all of my images in this series with a Canon 5D and a Canon 24-70mm f/2.8 L lens and I rented a Canon 16-35mm f/2.8 L lens to see how these images would work out with it and also to take a series of overview shots of larger areas of buildings.

What I learned is that a new lens with a wider angle of view will take some practice to get the most out of. My hit rate on the 200 images I took today was pretty low. Maybe best to just buy this lens as its been on my B&H wish list for about 4 years now.