RAW

Adobe Camera RAW supported cameras

I just got a Fuji X100T and in setting it up, I wasn’t sure if my version of Lightroom (5.7 as of this post) would be able to process the RAW files the new Fuji will produce.

A bit of searching led me to this list at the incredibly difficult to use Adobe web site:

Camera Raw plug-in | Supported cameras

The heading that’s meaningful to me is the one on the right: “Minimum Lightroom version required” and it seems the new Fuji X100T is supported, as is the new Panasonic LX100 and Canon G7X neither of which I have but they are popular new cameras.

While there are many aspects of dealing with Adobe that drive me crazy, their tools are first rate and they do update their RAW plug-in quickly enough to support early adopters of new cameras.

Glass box

Glass box (RAW)

RAW file processed in Lightroom

New York City. These two images are another test of the high contrast black and white setting in the Ricoh GR vs the same RAW image processed in Lightroom. Each process has its strengths and I’m glad that modern cameras give us the ability to make two files, the original RAW and the in-camera processed JPEG.

There’s no downside to shooting this way except it makes for more work later. So far, I’m enjoying the work and the results.

Glass box (high contrast JPEG)

High contrast JPEG processed in camera

Succulent test

Succulent 1 (JPEG)

Succulent 1 (JPEG)

Succulent 1 (RAW)

Succulent 1 (RAW)

Santa Monica, California. We took a walk down the palisades park overlooking the Pacific Ocean which my mother thinks is totally boring but I love. We’ve done it many times but I’d never shot the large succulents on the side of the walkway. Edward Weston came to mind as I thought about what these might look like using the Ricoh GR’s high contrast black and white setting.

I have the GR set up to take both RAW and jpeg and have the JPEG set to this high contest grainy filter.

I got the images home, got them into lightroom (all of them, RAWs and JPEGs) and decided to do an experiment.

I cropped them all the same so there were three sets of two images, one RAW/color, one high contrast monochrome (I took more but only kept these).

Then I processed one of the RAWs as high contrast black and whites experimenting with Lightroom’s various presets and tweaking as needed. Then I copied and pasted the settings from that one onto each of the various RAWs, something I do regularly when I want settings across a set.

Then I compared the converted RAWs with the high contrast JPEGs processed in camera.

I like the RAWs better. They’re less stark and the grain is gone (although I can make it again if I want) but there’s a lot more detail/information and I was missing that in these stark high contrast JPEGs.

Don’t get me wrong, I like the high contrast setting and will keep it because it allows me to use it on the LCD to look for light and contrast, but when I want more detail I’ll use the RAW files and process them in Lightroom. No doubt at times I’ll want the look of the JPEG and will use it. It’s nice to have options.

In this series, in case you can’t see it, the high contrast JPEG processed in the Ricoh GR comes first, the same image in RAW processed by me in Lightroom second.

Succulent 2 (JPEG)

Succulent 2 (JPEG)

Succulent 2 (RAW)

Succulent 2 (RAW)

Succulent 3 (JPEG)

Succulent 3 (JPEG)

Succulent 3 (RAW)

Succulent 3 (RAW)