Process

Primitive Technology: Tiled Roof Hut

This is a fantastic process video on making the “ceramic” or fired mud tiles for a hut. Another brilliant piece and this one particularly dear to my heart because of my background in ceramics.

There are many more at the Primitive Technology site and for those who prefer, he has a Primitive Technology YouTube Channel.

[via Dale Allyn]

AIDA Prima construction time-lapse

Time-lapse video of the construction of a modern cruise ship in Nagasaki, Japan. The last part of the video is the ship being christened in Hamburg, Germany harbor during a festival they were having there.

I can’t stop watching this. The tinker-toy modularity of it, it’s fascinating. And, like watching heavy, large commercial airplanes take off, it’s hard to fathom that this thing floats with all of that steel in it.

Painting in the Dark

The Long Game Part 3: Painting in the Dark from Delve on Vimeo.

“Painting in the Dark: The Struggle for Art in A World Obsessed with Popularity is the long overdue follow up to the Long Game Parts 1 & 2 which looked at the creative ups and downs of Leonardo da Vinci. In this new video essay, I’ve taken a look at the forgotten difficult years of another celebrated artist and wondered what it means for creative people working today.”

This is a fantastic video essay by Adam Westbrook that uses the life and work of Vincent Van Gogh to illustrate the idea that people who are driven to create, many times do so in obscurity without much recognition to drive them during their lifetimes.

It also illustrates the messiness of a growth process: people aren’t machines, they make good and bad choices in their lives and have ups and downs. No doubt some of our greatest minds (artists, scientists, and others) have never been discovered and their ideas go to the grave with them.

Adam has made other essays leading up to this one that you should have a look at as well. His Vimeo channel is: Delve.

[via Colossal]

Later That Same Life

This is one of the most creative videos I’ve ever seen, bar none. And, it’s so simple yet so profound. Oh my, this is really good.

“56-year-old (Peter) Stoney Emshwiller is interviewed by his own 18-year-old self from the year 1977. In the late 70s teenaged Stoney Emshwiller filmed several hours of himself pretending to interview his future self. Emshwiller went on to be an actor, novelist, editor, filmmaker and artist. Recently he released a sizzle reel – still on its way to being a longer film – of his older self answering some of those questions. Poignant and funny, this concept reminds us that the closest any of us can get to time traveling is still through the magic of recorded media.”

Here’s Stoney’s pitch:

And here’s the site to help fund the project. I just contributed, it’s one of the most interesting and original projects I’ve seen in years and I’m delighted to support it.

[via Devour]

A portrait session with a twist

Planting an idea of who someone is in a portrait photographer’s head can influence how they see and shoot the person. Six portrait photographers were asked to shoot one man, each of them told a different story about who he is. This is a fascinating video made by Canon.

Petapixel has deconstructed it in their blog post, so, watch it first, then check out their post: 6 Photographers Asked to Shoot Portraits of 1 Man… With a Twist.

Harper Lee and the cinematic life of To Kill a Mockingbird

Harper Lee and the Cinematic Life of To Kill A Mockingbird

This is a great post on how the just published book, To Kill a Mockingbird got turned into a movie.

When Philadelphia-based publisher J.B. Lippincott Company decided to publish Harper Lee’s debut novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, the company requested an initial print run of just 5,000 copies. Nevertheless, upon its release in July 1960, the novel swiftly gained popularity and earned a place on the New York Times bestseller list. Unusual for a promising literary property, the motion picture rights to which were often sold before publication, To Kill a Mockingbird spent six weeks on the list before producer Alan J. Pakula and director Robert Mulligan acquired the rights to the book, which would go on to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1961.

Incredible book. Incredible movie. Incredible story.

NUMMI 2015

NUMMI 2015

This is a brilliant segment of This American Life in collaboration with Frank Langfitt and NPR news.

A car plant in Fremont California that might have saved the U.S. car industry. In 1984, General Motors and Toyota opened NUMMI as a joint venture. Toyota showed GM the secrets of its production system: How it made cars of much higher quality and much lower cost than GM achieved. Frank Langfitt explains why GM didn’t learn the lessons—until it was too late.

Wikipedia has a nice history of the NUMMI plant.

The NUMMI plant was bought by Tesla and their cars are now made there. Here’s a video of production of the Tesla Model S in the same plant.