photographer

A Japanese Photographer’s View of Life in His Family’s One-Room Home

A Japanese Photographer’s View of Life in His Family’s One-Room Home

Meoko Fujii at The New Yorker has posted an incredible collection of the photographs of the Japanese photographer Masaki Yamamoto that are part of his new photo book: Guts.

Guts documents his seven-person family’s life in a one-room apartment in Kobe, Japan. This is a gritty but fascinating glimpse of a kind of life that few of us will ever experience but it’s not so foreign that we can’t imagine it. This is amazing work and once the book is in wider circulation I hope to get it.

Steve McCurry at The Rubin Museum

The photographer Steve McCurry has a show at the Rubin Museum in New York: Steve McCurry, India which I saw when I was in New York last Friday.

If you are anywhere near New York once the snow has cleared and you are remotely interested in photography, India, or a beautifully presented show, see this show. Seeing McCurry’s work printed this large and beautifully presented is breathtaking and his are some of the most iconic and magnificent images of life in India I’ve ever seen.

If you don’t know McCurry’s work, you might be familiar with his most iconic image for National Geographic: Afghan Girl.

I hadn’t been to the Rubin Museum before and I must say, it’s a beautiful place, easy to walk through and the presentation of artwork is excellent.

Rubin Museum of Art
150 West 17th Street
New York, NY 10011

Note: They’re closed Tuesdays.

This show runs from November 18, 2015 – April 4, 2016 so you have time to wait until the snow melts.

I plan to be in New York again this Wednesday and I’ll be going back to this show, it’s that good.

Henri Cartier-Bresson “Pen, Brush and Camera”

This is a terrific documentary on the life and work of Henri Cartier-Bresson, arguably one of the greatest photographers of the 20th century (to which he humbly says: “bullshit!”).

It’s close to an hour long so make the time for it and I can say without a doubt that it’s well worth seeing.

Cartier-Bresson had a background in fine arts which informed his work but he was also a great humanist which also informed his work. He was a founder of Magnum one of the top photo agencies in the world.

He remains one of my favorite photographers and personalities: a humble man who has influenced generations of photographers and people in all branches of the arts.

[via PetaPixel]

Andre D. Wagner, photographer

Andre D. Wagner, Photographer from abstractElements on Vimeo.

This is a very nicely done video on Brooklyn, NY based street photographer Andre D. Wagner.

This is the kind of guy I hope goes very far: he’s got all the right ideas and his work reflects both a great handle on process and a lot of trial, error, and learning. To do all of this with a wet process shows both great dedication to craft and, as he says in the film, a love of slowing things down.

I’m not a street photographer but if I ever got into it, Andre is the kind of street photographer I’d like to be.

[via PetaPixel]

Manhattanhenge 2014

An hour before Manhattanhenge

An hour before Manhattanhenge

Park Avenue above Pershing Square (in front of Grand Central Station), New York.

I thought it would be interesting not to shoot Manhattanhenge (an interesting sunset between buildings in New York) but to shoot the people who were shooting it. Gary and I arrived about an hour before it was supposed to happen and this series of images documents how the crowd grew in about an hour.

We had a blast and met lots of great people. I was amazed at the range of equipment people brought to Manhattanhenge: everything from nothing at all (just came to hang out) to serious tripods and Canon 1 class cameras with a big bag of L lenses (and the Nikon equivalent was present too). The folks next to us had Canon 6Ds with 24-70 and 24-105 lenses on them and both had point and shoot cameras and phones too.

Gary and I came equipped with Ricoh GR, Sony RX100 III and our iPhones. We shot mostly with the Sonys as the articulated LCD made framing easy (looking down).

As you may note in the progression of images, the folks on the front railing got deeper as it got closer to “the time” and traffic had to go into the oncoming lane to avoid hitting people. About ten minutes before “the time” a police cruiser came by and turned on the bullhorn and told people to disperse or be arrested. It was a reasonable request, the folks on the front site were blocking traffic. We then ran down Park and back toward Grand Central to see if we could catch it under the overpass and of course, after all that Manhattanhenge didn’t happen, it was too cloudy.

Didn’t matter to Gary and me, we came to shoot people, not the sunset, so we were happy.

An hour before Manhattanhenge

An hour before Manhattanhenge

An hour before Manhattanhenge

An hour before Manhattanhenge

Kissing couple at Manhattanhenge

Kissing couple at Manhattanhenge

Girl on stool at Manhattanhenge

Girl on stool at Manhattanhenge

Manhattanhenge

Manhattanhenge crowd getting bigger

Manhattanhenge

Manhattanhenge crowd getting bigger

Manhattanhenge

Manhattanhenge crowd getting bigger

Crowd blocking traffic at Manhattanhenge

Crowd blocking traffic at Manhattanhenge

Manhattanhenge

Photographers at Manhattanhenge

Gary at Manhattanhenge

Gary at Manhattanhenge

Couple from Japan at Manhattanhenge

Couple from Japan at Manhattanhenge

Manhattanhenge

Getting serious at Manhattanhenge

The cops arrive at Manhattanhenge

The cops arrive at Manhattanhenge

Shooting under Park Avenue at Manhattanhenge

Shooting under Park Avenue at Manhattanhenge

Martin Schoeller’s catalog of portraits

This is a brilliant presentation by the photographer Martin Schoeller for National Geographic. The prelude on how he came to a “cataloguing” style by seeing the series of water towers by the German photographers Bernd and Hilla Becher is a wonderful self-reflection on how he came to his portrait style.

The idea of keeping many things constant: lens, lighting, aspect ratio, etc. and just varying the subject is attractive to me and it’s part of the reason I enjoy using cameras that have fixed prime lenses: the angle of view remains constant.

Petapixel interview with Martin Schoeller

[via PetaPixel]