memory

Logging your life’s photographic memories with Memoto

Have you ever had the thought/dream of what it would be like to have enough of a photographic memory so that you could rewind through a day and replay a particular part? Something like “neural photography” where the mechanism is built into a brain (eyes as lenses), maybe with the ability to replay on a screen outside the brain. My fantasy is a continuous movie but it could just as well be stop action.

The GoPro camera is a step in that direction and it’s extremely popular. But, one still has to edit a lot of raw video.

Here is another early step toward that: the Memoto Lifelogging camera.

You wear a small, clip-on camera that takes two pictures a minute continuously on its own and embeds time and GPS information in each image. At the end of the day you plug the camera into your computer via USB and it recharges and uploads the images to the Memoto servers which organize the images into days, hours, and make the GPS information available as well so you can see where you were.

You can then rewind a day, labeling things like: “trip to New York” or “playing with dog” to more easily go back and find things. Watch the video, read down the first page of the Kickstarter post, read the comments and consider the idea.

I’m not sure it will be a success as a business but it’s a very well designed system and a fascinating project.

Many people who take pictures have a huge mess in their photo library collections, like a large, unsorted box of prints, and for them finding things is difficult. Those very people tend not to fully appreciate and use the tagging and searching capabilities that tools like iPhoto, Aperture, and Lightroom provide for sorting by date, place, or even lens used to take a picture. I’m not sure those people need even more photographic memories. On the other hand, this may be exactly the kind of photographic memory they need: automatic and seemingly easy to use.

It will be fun to watch.

[via Jon Moss]

Memo Touch

Introducing Memo Touch, a tablet designed for elders with short-term memory loss

While the implementation may not be the best, this is a killer good idea and it allows family members to log into the account and set up reminders.

Of course, someone might write an app like this for iOS and then one could have all the benefits of an iPad plus a custom reminder system.

The problem with any idea like this is it has to be made fully accessible to people who can’t see, hear, or use the tablet’s UI well.

I think this is a job for my friend David Niemeijer at AssistiveWare.