Macintosh

MacPaint print

MacPaint print

I had one of the first 128K Macintosh computers in Eugene, Oregon and while I did a lot of writing with MacWrite, I also did a lot of “drawing” with MacPaint.

MacPaint was written by Bill Atkinson (one of the core members of the original Macintosh team at Apple) who added lots of fun touches to all of his early software. MacPaint had various distortions and to be honest, I can’t remember which one was responsible for this image (maybe “invert” and/or “trace edges”). I didn’t draw this; instead I drew some random shapes and chose what would now be called a “filter” and this was the result. It delighted me to no end and I made hundreds of these which I printed on my ImageWriter dot matrix printer.

I’m posting this now because I’m cleaning our basement and found boxes and boxes of old Macintosh related keepsakes, including some of my old writing and drawing done on my first Mac (not my first computer but close).

I had to run upstairs and pop an antihistamine; between dust and mold it was like an archeological dig.

SuperPaint

SuperPaint (front of box)

I was cleaning out a box of old boxes (I love boxes) and found this product box from 1986.

Those of us who started with MacPaint eventually graduated to other tools. I was a MacDraw fanatic (object-oriented graphics) but still needed a bit-mapped painting program (this was pre-Photoshop). SuperPaint was what many of us used and it was like MacPaint on steroids.

If you remember, “FatBits” was MacPaint’s zoomed mode, “LaserBits” was something similar with SuperPaint (as memory serves). SuperPaint had all sorts of creative touches that were great fun for those of us who enjoyed MacPaint.

I’m posting two images, one of the front of the box, one of the back. If this history interests you, read the back to see more about what graphics programs looked like pre-Photoshop.

SuperPaint (back of box)

Bill Atkinson on the birth of the Macintosh computer

Leo LaPorte interviews Bill Atkinson on the 40th anniversary of Apple, Inc. on the birth of the Macintosh computer.

I was a very early Mac user, met Bill Atkinson numerous times in the HyperCard days when I demoed it for Apple, and met various members of the early Mac team after Steve Jobs gave me my first Macintosh in late 1984.

This is great stuff and Atkinson (and Andy Hertzfeld) were pioneers in the history of personal computing. I met Andy when he gave me an early (beta) copy of Switcher at Macworld.

[via The Loop]

Update on home made Time Capsule

A month ago I posted on my experiment with a Home made Time Capsule and I’ve learned some things and changed some things since that long post.

First let me say that while I think this setup is fantastic and every Mac user should be doing something like this, this is not my only method of backing up my computer. I’ve continued to use SuperDuper to do a complete clone of my computer every day.

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This setup worked perfectly, when it worked. Time Machine works in the background so the only way I knew it was working or not was to check it’s system preference pane from time to time to see when the last backup was. Time Machine is supposed to attempt a backup every hour when the computer is awake and connected to the network but I was noticing that there were times when it was skipping 1/2 a day at at time.

Something was up. So, I left the system preference pane open so I could watch what was happening. I watched as Time Machine attempted a backup but the drive never spun up and mounted. If I unplugged and replugged the USB cable of the drive it would spin up and Time Machine would find it and work.

I wasn’t sure what the problem was but I had a feeling that the portable USB 3 bus-powered drive I was using wasn’t getting the wakeup message from Time Machine, either because USB 2 (what’s on the AirPort Extreme) or the drive itself was missing the intelligence to wake the drive from sleep at the needed time.

Bus-powered drives tend to be 2.5″ HD mechanisms for portability and these smaller mechanisms don’t need as much power to run so can run off of the power in a USB cable connection to a computer (they’re what are inside laptops as well as portable cases). Desktop drives tend to have 3.5″ HD mechanisms in them and have power bricks. And, they cost less for a lot more storage.

I thought maybe a desktop drive might solve this problem but I decided to pass this question (bus powered or desktop) on to someone I knew had a similar setup on his home network. He’s a developer who I met online many years ago through a mutual friend but who I’ve never met in person: Scott Gruby (this seems to be quite common these days).

Scott agreed: the bus powered drive was probably the problem and a desktop drive might solve it. He uses a Western Digital RAID drive on his network and I don’t need RAID but decided to look into their standard desktop drives. The Western Digital My Book seemed like a good way to go. 4TB for about $110 and decent reviews on Amazon. Its a larger case with a 3.5″ 4TB drive in it, no fan, and a power brick.

Given that there are many drives in this category I decided to take a look at the BackBlaze Hard Drive Reliability Review for 2015. Interestingly, in 2014 Western Digital was their most reliable drive but in 2015 it had been overtaken by Seagate.

In looking through the Amazon reviews of the Seagate 4TB desktop drive I noticed one comment/review that caught my eye. A Mac user attempting to use the drive as I am, connected to an AirPort Extreme for Time Machine over the air backups. He found that the drive did not mount on time for the backups to work. So, for me, that eliminated the Seagate and I ended up with the WD 4TB My Book for Mac. The Mac and non-Mac version cost the same so I figured I’d get the one with “Mac” on the case. I partition and format all of my drives so it doesn’t matter to me if the drive comes pre-formatted for the Mac.

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The new drive came, I formatted it and got it connected to the AirPort. It’s very quiet, no fan and the spinning drive makes very little noise. I can hear it but it’s not obnoxious.

I decided to start from scratch and redo the Time Machine backups of both my wife’s MacBook Air and my MacBook Pro on the new drive. I started with my wife’s machine because it doesn’t have much on it. The initial backup took about 2 hours and worked flawlessly. Over the next two days my wife’s computer backed itself up to the new drive every hour. The drive went to sleep, then awoke for the backup every time. This was great, exactly what I was hoping for.

Then I started the initial backup of my MacBook Pro. Estimated time: 12 hours.

The great thing about Time Machine is that even on the initial backup I was able to close my computer (stopping the backup) and move to a different part of the house, open my computer (continuing the backup) until the initial backup was done.

Over the next few weeks I’ve kept track of Time Machine’s system preference pane on both my computer and my wife’s and the new drive is spinning up and mounting every time. If both machines want to back up at the same time Time Machine knows to form a line (so to speak).

I think the power supply of a desktop drive is probably essential for this application, but, there must also be something in each drive’s controller that allows it to be awaken by Time Machine. I can’t say that I’ve tested other desktop drives at this point but I take that Amazon commenter at his word that the very popular Seagate drive didn’t work for him. It might be that other brands work, I don’t know but I do know that the drive I got has been flawless so far.

Time will tell.

Home made Time Capsule

R0001255Many people think of the networking gear in their houses (cable or DSL modem, WIFI router) like plumbing: they get it all installed and set up and then forget about it as it runs in the background.

The problem with this thinking is that the amount of stuff we have moving through this “pipe” is increasing at a rapid rate. It was acceptable to have a 300 baud dial up modem in the old days for email and AOL but now that we have the internet and streaming video and voice over IP and all sorts of other stuff running through the same pipe, having a faster internet connection is important.

In short, we upgrade our computers from time to time to take advantage of new and faster processing power but we tend to not upgrade our home networks.

In fact, cable modems can be upgraded and cable internet services can be upgraded as well and it’s useful these days to look into that if you have a lot of stuff connected to your cable modem and home network: AirPort router, Apple TV, computers, printers, thermostats, etc.

Downstream of the cable modem is the router which tends to be a bigger bottleneck than a cable modem. I’ve been using Apple AirPort routers since they appeared and while I’ve sometimes been slow to upgrade them, I do consider upgrading them when newer models have faster speeds or more capabilities.

The latest model of the AirPort Extreme has been made taller to incorporate larger antennas for better coverage and the wifi protocol has been upgraded to 802.11ac to accommodate the increased use of streaming video. We’ve been using one since they came out over a year ago and it’s improved our network speeds considerably and given us much better coverage both in and outside our house.

Backup

I use SuperDuper! to back up my MacBook Pro and I back up my wife’s MacBook Air with it as well (on a separate disk). I also have a hard disk dedicated to Time Machine which I manually connect to my MacBook Pro daily to make a different kind of backup. I stared using Apple’s Time Machine religiously when I bought a new computer and Migration Assistant balked at recognizing my SuperDuper backup disk and I had to use my Time Machine backup disk to migrate my stuff onto the new machine.

A piece of me will always like the SuperDuper (or Carbon Copy Cloner) kind of backup better: you’re left with a disk that is essentially a clone of your computer and you can boot from it. This means that if your computer has a problem, you can easily boot another one from your backup and be back in business immediately.

However, Time Machine has it’s selling points as well, the most important of which (for me) is that it’s automatic, happens over the air, and once it’s set up and working, falls into the background.

Apple has combined a Time Machine hard disk and an AirPort Extreme router in a product called Time Capsule which looks identical to an AirPort Extreme router except it’s got a 2 or 3TB hard disk in it.

This product has appealed to me for years but there’s something about having a hard disk built into a device in a way that makes it tough to replace that scares me. And, what happens when you buy a new Time Capsule to replace an old one? How easy or awkward is it to move your backups to a new one?

It would seem to me that it might be better to connect an external hard disk to the AirPort Extreme and treat it as a Time Capsule. This way you get the benefit of over the air backups but can replace or even remove (for safe keeping) the hard disk.

Experiments and what I learned

File sharing has been possible with AirPort Extreme routers for a long time now. You can plug a USB hard disk into the router, find it on your home network, and copy files to and from it. However, the Time Machine software would not work with disks connected this way. No doubt there were many reasons for this but the one that seems likely is that the firmware on the AirPort router has to be able to wake a connected disk from sleep when the Time Machine software wants to use it. And, once the copying is done, the disk needs to be able to spin down.

When I started researching this a few weeks ago I found this article on TidBits: Use Time Machine with the 802.11ac AirPort Extreme Base Station. The article is a few years old and comments are closed but it was a useful read for me.

Then I read the Time Machine entry on Wikipedia: Time Machine (OS X) and specifically noted this:

“On a Time Capsule, the backup data is stored in an HFS+ disk image and accessed via Apple Filing Protocol. Although it is not officially supported, users and manufacturers have configured Linux servers and network-attached storage systems to serve Time Machine-enabled Macs.”

I then did a bit more digging and found this from Apple: AirPort base stations: About USB disks

“OS X Time Machine supports compatible unencrypted USB disks connected to AirPort Time Capsule (802.11n and 802.11ac), and AirPort Extreme (802.11ac).”

Then I found this piece by Apple: Backup disks you can use with Time Machine

“An external USB drive connected to an AirPort Time Capsule (any model) or AirPort Extreme (802.11ac model only)”

Time Machine has two different file protocols for two different ways storage devices are connected to a Mac. USB, Firewire, or Thunderbolt disks directly connected to the Mac get a different type of backup than Time Capsules or disks connected via USB to an AirPort Extreme both of which are being written to over the air. I found this out by noting that when I first connected my already in-use Time Machine hard disk to my AirPort base station Time Machine would not continue to backup to the existing file(s), it kept wanting to make a new backup. This is because the local backup files are different from the networked backup files. This difference is probably because of security and possibly other speed related issues.

How to do it

You’ll need a hard disk or SSD with at least as much storage as the disk you’re backing up. A Time Capsule will back up multiple machines on a network so you need to add up the sizes of all the various machines you’re backing up.

Time Machine will continue making incremental backups until it runs out of room, then it starts deleting the oldest backups.

My wife has a MacBook Air with 128GB of SSD, I have a MacBook Pro with 1TB of SSD. Neither of us has more than half of our storage used.

I had an older 1TB Lacie Rugged Drive with a USB 3 port on it. Its not super fast (5400 RPM) but given that it’s connected via USB 2 I figured drive speed wasn’t an issue. If I buy another hard disk for this I’ll no doubt get a 3 or 4TB disk.

I found that desktop (AC powered) vs portable (bus powered) isn’t an issue as long as the disks adhere closely to the USB protocols (for mounting and sleeping).

Format the disk with disk utility as you would a normal, modern OS X disk: Mac OS Extended (Journaled). Consider naming it “Time Machine” or “Backup” or something other than “Untitled.”

Connect the formatted, empty disk to your AirPort Extreme base station’s USB port.

Run the AirPort Utility, click on your AirPort Extreme, and click “edit.”

Click the “Disks” tab.

Click Enable File Sharing.

Secure Shared disks with a password. It can be a simple password and each machine using this disk will store the password in its keychain.

You could also use “Accounts” to remember the Mac OS X accounts using the disk. We used password.

I did not click the “Share disks over WAN” checkbox. Checking this would allow you to get to this disk from outside your home network. This is probably safe but somehow it scares me. If anyone reading this has experience doing this I’d love to hear about it.

When you have this screen set up as you want it, click “Update” at the bottom to update the settings on your AirPort Extreme.

That’s it, you’re done.

You should see your AirPort Extreme base station in the finder on the left side of the main Finder window under “Shared” but if you don’t, you will the next time you log in or restart. You don’t need to interact with the disk there unless you want to use it for non-Time Machine related file sharing.

Go to the Apple Menu and choose System Preferences, then click on Time Machine in the bottom row of icons.

Turn Time Machine on if it was off, select disk and consider clicking the “Show Time Machine in Menu Bar” checkbox so you can monitor things easily as you get started with this.

After this, backups should happen automatically. The first backup takes a long time but what’s great about this is you just go about using your machine as always and it will stop and restart on its own. My machine’s screen went to sleep but as far as I know, Time Machine kept working in the background. My wife leaves her machine open but sleeping and it wakes up and does it’s backup, then goes back to sleep. Very slick.

You can monitor what’s happening in the Time Machine preferences pane which you can now get to easily in the Time Machine menu on the menu bar.

I’ve had this set up working for three days on both my wife’s and my machine and it’s simply amazing, no bumps, and while I’ve not tested the backups, I have run the Time Machine application on each of our machines and poked around in the backups and it’s working as it should.

So far, so good. Again, very slick.

Wish list for future AirPort / Time Capsule routers

It would be great if both the AirPort Extreme and Time Capsule had faster USB or some other, faster connection protocol. It would make the initial backup faster and allow faster file sharing on connected disks. It’s not essential but given that USB 3 is a standard on Apple devices and hard disks, that would be nice.

One thing that would get me to dump my home made set up and buy a “real” Apple Time Capsule would be if the Time Capsule backed up iOS devices like my iPhone and iPad. The fact that I have to use the kludge that is iTunes to back those devices up to my Mac, then have my Mac backed up is awkward. No doubt Apple wants to sell more iCloud backup space for iOS devices but a local backup would be good as well.

No doubt there’s a lot more Apple might do with the AirPort Extreme to support the coming home control (HomeKit) devices people will be connecting to their networks.

Until then, my home made Time Capsule is working just fine. Let me know if you give this a try or have suggestions for improvement.

Lightroom 6

Adobe has released a new version of its photo editing and cataloging software, Lightroom.

Version 6 adds a few capabilities, fixes bugs, but most importantly it uses the GPU chips in modern computers more than previous versions which increases its speed dramatically in processor-intensive tasks. Check out the chart in this review: Lightroom 6 arrives with performance improvements and new tools.

Personally, I’m no fan of Adobe. While I think Lightroom is the best tool available there are UI and UX design issues that have persisted in it since it was born and as you will see below, Adobe just does not get user experience at all and treats users like thieves.

I was hoping that Apple’s new Photos application that has replaced both iPhoto and Aperture might be good enough for me to leave the Adobe ship once and for all, but after using Photos for a week I can say for sure that while it will no doubt improve in future versions, and I’ve moved my entire iPhoto library into it and thrown out iPhoto, Photos is not a replacement for Lightroom or Aperture for serious work with images.

Lightroom remains the best image editing and organizing tool out there for my photographic process and I upgraded to Lightroom 6 yesterday.

How to buy and/or upgrade

Adobe would like you to subscribe to their “Creative Cloud” which, for $9.99 a month gives you access to Lightroom and Photoshop and apps that run on mobile devices and a small amount of cloud space to store images to sync to multiple devices. I was concerned that this was the only way they were selling Lightroom and as a long time user I’m only interested in having the software running on my computer, not my iPad or iPhone.

If you’re not logged into the Adobe site and you scroll to the bottom of this page you’ll see 5 rectangles, the one in the bottom right says: Lightroom 6: For desktop only. Mobile capabilities not included, Buy Now. It pisses me off that Adobe buries the stand-alone application and they really want us all to subscribe so they’re pushing one over the other. I was logged into the Adobe site when I first went looking for this and it was not to be found. If you don’t see it, make sure you’re logged out (you can log back in later in the process).

Once you hit “Buy Now” and are looking at your cart, you’ll see Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 6 in your basket. Now comes the incredibly unintuitive part.

I was concerned that there was no upgrade path for users of earlier versions of Lightroom but in fact, there is but Adobe in all of it’s infinite wisdom (not) chose to bury it, again trying to force you to pay full price again. Ugh.

Click the “Edit” button on the right and you’ll notice that things will change on the left.

Where is says: “I want to buy: Full” note that “Full” is now a pulldown menu. Pull it down and choose “Upgrade.”

The next line is: “I own:” and a pulldown menu for the version of Lightroom you own. I own Lightroom 5.X so I chose it.

Lastly the click the orange “Save Changes” button at the bottom. The price will change from the full $149 price to the $79 upgrade price.

The orange button is now “Checkout” and once you click there you can pay for the upgrade and a screen or two later, download the Mac or Win version.

The rest is Adobe’s convoluted serial number entering process which, if you use their products you’ll be painfully familiar with.

Note: A big thank you to my good friend Edward for help with this. I had no clue it was possible to upgrade until he showed me the steps above.

Is it worth it?

In a word, yes. After opening my 8000 image library up (a mixture of Canon 5D RAWs, Ricoh GR RAWs and Sony RX100 RAWs) and moving through it I can say that on my mid-2014 Retina MacBook Pro (2.8 GHz Core i7, 16 GB memory, Intel Iris Pro 1536, 1TB SSD this upgrade of Lightroom is significantly faster at almost everything.

At some point this summer I plan to buy a Retina iMac for image editing and book creation and I was concerned that the rumors of Lightroom being slow on the huge, high resolution screen would be an issue. I’m pretty sure Adobe took care of that with this version which makes better use of the GPU to render images much faster.

All of my presets, both in the Develop module and the Print module are there and the application just feels snappier which is very nice considering I’m using it on a very fast computer.

For me and the kind of work I do this upgrade is worth it. $79 every two years might seem like a lot of money in this time where we buy apps from the Mac app store for $5 and they upgrade automatically for free, but in fact, Lightroom is a different animal and while I wish Adobe would put it in the app store with automatic .X upgrades, I don’t resent paying this kind of money for it as it’s a serious, industrial-strength application that does what it does well.

If you’re a desktop computer Lightroom user this upgrade is well worth doing.

Apple updates Yosemite and iOS 8

For those of you who are Mac OS Yosemite and/or iOS 8 users, the two software updates that Apple posted yesterday seem (to me) to have fixed many if not all of the problems I was having with both my computer and my iPhone 5S and iPad Air 2.

Mac OS X version 10.10.2 is the update and it can be gotten through the App store and software update.

My computer wasn’t re-connecting to my network after sleeping and I was restarting it multiple times a day to remain connected. That problem is gone now; wake from sleep is faster and the network connection is solid.

iOS 8.1.3 seems to have fixed the networking problems I was having with both my iPhone and my iPad and I’m remaining connected to iCloud (so far). I had random disconnects on my iPhone. Time will tell if that got fixed.

I’m delighted that Apple released the Mac OS update given the fact that they sold 74 million iPhones last quarter and the iPhone made up 69% of Apple amazing revenue, it’s a wonder anyone at Apple is paying attention to the Mac anymore but they are and I’m delighted as I’m a Mac user first and foremost, an iOS user second. Of course, no matter how much revenue an Apple device brings in, it should work as well as possible at all times and software updates to get rid of bugs are important. Thank you Apple.

For more on Apple’s fiscal Q1 statement, see this amazing list at 9to5Mac. Wow.

The software and services Apple needs to fix

The software and services Apple needs to fix

Glenn Fleishman, a long time Apple guru and tech writer has put together a great post following up on Marco Arment’s post that has caused quite a stir in the Apple tech community. He’s asked for comment-reports on bugs not mentioned and he’s getting hundreds. The comments are worth reading too.

I posted about this earlier here and I’m glad that these higher-profile folks are putting these issues on the table.

We have to be careful to not have a double standard in the Apple world: it’s okay to talk about how bad Windows and Android are, not so okay to talk about problems with Mac OS or iOS. The fact that haters will jump on this is immaterial and should never stop us from voicing our opinions about how Apple is doing.

My concern is that we don’t give the haters stuff to chew on by having a double standard about venting criticism because we’re concerned we’re going to give the haters stuff to chew on.

I think in the end, the Foxconn factory “issue” turned into something positive for Apple. Sure, there are some who will use it forever but they’re outliers. Sometimes its best for this stuff to come out and have faith that Cook and Co. will do the right thing: talk about it themselves to take control of the narrative and work to make it better.

My simple-minded view is that it looks like Apple is concerned with surface appearance and needs to put a lot more time into underlying mechanics which aren’t as sexy and are tough to talk about but now that this meme is out there, it would be easy for Apple to use it to their advantage as they make things better.

Caitlin and Macintosh

Caitlin and Macintosh

Caitlin and her dad’s Macintosh at The Forman School, Litchfield, Connecticut, around 1986

I was scanning some other old photographs and came across this one, had to scan it and once done, had to tell the story of it.

In 1985 I was hired by a small boarding school for dyslexic high school students to put in a Macintosh lab and design a writing curriculum using Macs for the particular needs of those kids. The person who hired me was Caitlin’s mother Laurie and for the next two years Laurie and I built that early program together. In the process, I got to know her family well and her oldest daughter Caitlin and I became close friends.

Laurie’s husband, Eric was also an early Mac geek and so they had this Mac Plus in a small office that they all shared. When her dad was off at work Caitlin took over.

Caitlin’s family left the school shortly after I did. They moved to Kyoto, Japan for Eric to join a telecommunications laboratory doing research on the physical aspects of making language (he’s a research linguist). Caitlin and her two sisters became fluent in Japanese. We visited them there (pre digital photography) and I have yet to scan the pictures but I hope to at some point.

Caitlin came back to the US for college before the rest of her family and, well, the rest we’ll leave for another story.

Here’s a post I did on her in between these two images: Caitlin laughing.

Of course time marches on and Caitlin and her husband are building a homestead in North Carolina where they live with their sons, dog, chickens, and at least a few iPhones if not a lot more geekery.

Note: I’m guessing I took this with an Olympus XA. Even though I brought a MacVision and surveillance video camera with me from Oregon to Connecticut, it was a rather awkward setup for still photography.

Caitlin and Axton

Caitlin and Axton, New Woodstock, New York, 2013

My friend Caitlin Bateson and her son Axton at her grandfather’s memorial gathering in upstate New York.

Talk about an “arc of time.” Put the previous picture together with this one and it’s a mind blow.

I’ve known Caitlin since 1985.

Apple needs to slow down: surface appearance vs. underlying form

Declining iOS and OS X quality imperil Appleā€™s future growth and retention

Amen.

I’ve been waiting for someone else to post about this for me to let go my rant.

It seems that Jony Ive spent a lot of time on the way things look, but very little time on the way things work (or don’t work). This reminds me of the Robert Pirsig’s epic rant about his friend’s loose handlebars in Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (his friend was concerned with surface appearance instead of underlying form and usability and wouldn’t let Pirsig fix the lose handlebar with an aluminum beer can shim instead wanting to get a BMW official part, etc.).

As far as I’m concerned, my Mac, iPhone and iPad all look great but have loose handlebars and Apple needs to get things tightened up. Too much concern with form, not enough with function. I don’t know where the problem lies but these issues started at about the same time Jony Ive took over the entire software enterprise at Apple and he’s a designer, not a software guy.

This is a very bad omen going forward. With a growing installed base for Mac OS, there should be fewer and fewer system level bugs in the OS. There are more than ever now.

I’m very pro-Apple so don’t take this the wrong way, but in the past few years the quality of Mac OS, iOS and iCloud and iTunes services has gone downhill.

I’m running a brand new (newest model) MacBook Pro 15″ retina, everything maxed out. I have plenty of hardware power. I’m running the latest version of Yosemite which I clean installed on this new computer.

The computer freezes pretty regularly in the Finder.

Wake from sleep, wifi connection needs work to get connected. Restarting computer solves this but even with an SSD, I’d rather not do this.

The Finder main window opens in a different place on my screen at odd times, with different layouts chosen (I prefer column view, but don’t always get it).

I have Apple’s external CD/DVD burner but it gets confused every now and then about whether I’ve ejected a CD.

I bought a book in iBooks on the Mac and it came down corrupted. I noticed that a few of my other books, that I’d had a while were corrupted since Yosemite. I called Apple and 4 hours and 4 people later and after reinstalling Yosemite, the problem wasn’t fixed and I felt trashed. Apple support has also gone downhill. I started a long blog post about this but trashed it. This was the single worst support experience I’ve ever had with Apple and I’ve had great ones over many years. Apple support is not what it used to be.

The relationship between iBooks and iTunes used to be easy to understand. Now there is no relationship. And, iTunes has also gone downhill in terms of usability.

Location manager on all of my three Apple devices thinks I live two houses south of where I actually live. This is new with Yosemite/iOS 8. Location manager gets confused in the field at times (away from my house).

When I click on a link in Reeder and expect Safari to open, it sometimes freezes. This never happened in Mavericks. I do this often. I often cringe when I do it. This is not the way I want to feel using these great tools.

Finder freezes at times when copying a lot of image files onto a CD to burn. Drag them on, everything freezes up while copy happens (no screen feedback), then, either system hung or copy completes.

When I move my computer downstairs it struggles to continue to find my Apple Magic Mouse (bluetooth) sitting upstairs on my desk and reconnects and drops the connection numerous times before it releases it. This never happened in any earlier OS.

I’m asked for passwords by things connected to iCloud way too often. My iPhone, for no reason I can understand turned iCloud off by itself the other day. I turned it back on and put in the password but I’m not confident this will stick.

I’ve had so many problems with iOS 8 on both iPad Air 2 and iPhone 5S that I can’t list them here. It’s the most bug-ridden release yet for sure.

I could go on, but why bother.

This is incredibly depressing. While Apple is doing better than ever: selling lots of stuff, stock doing well, those of us who have been using Apple products for years know that things are not right, there are too many bugs and problems and it’s getting worse as Apple grows more quickly.

God help us when the Apple Watch ships. I’m delighted they’re making it but it’s an entirely new device with it’s own issues, it’s own software, it’s own support. Ugh.

I would be happy if Apple did not release any more new systems, new features, or new anything until they got all of this stuff working correctly and reliably.

I had such a bad experience with AppleCare with my small iBooks problem I’m not anxious to call them again, and this is not good as I’ve already paid for it for every one of our six Apple devices.

Get your act together Apple.