Leaf

Beech on snow

Beech on snow

Appalachian Trail, Kent, Connecticut.

There are a few beech trees next to Thayer Brook and they tend to hold at least some of their dried leaves all winter. When those leaves fall on the snow they look quite nice and while it might have been interesting to leave the light tan color in this, I liked how the leaf looked in monochrome with the reflective snow, almost translucent.

The tree that probably dropped this leaf is big enough so bears climb it for nuts in season. We call trees with bear claw marks on them “bear trees” and always inspect any beeches we see near the trail for bear claw marks. Of course, always good to look up to make sure the bear isn’t still up there.

Floating ginkgo leaves

Floating ginkgo leaves

The Japanese Garden, Van Nuys, California.

Back home in Connecticut fall is almost over: almost all of our leaves are down, the last of the oaks will be down this week no doubt (I have to do at least one more big cleanup when I get home). Here in Los Angeles, the gingko trees are shedding leaves and this was a nice collection of them that was floating on the water of this sewage treatment plant.

Yes, for those who tuned in late, the Japanese Garden is a very small part of a much larger sewage treatment plant. What a great idea to let this not quite finished grey water feed plants, fish, and birds.

Fall on the Appalachian Trail

Pine glen

Pine glen

On the Appalachian Trail between the Housatonic River in Sheffield, Massachusetts and Jug End Road.

I tend not to hike this section in summer, too muggy with too many mosquitoes but this day was great and the hike went very well.

This little glen is incredibly photogenic and there are so many great textures in it its crying out to be photographed.

Oak

Oak

This magnificent oak is on the other side of an electric fence and a field so getting closer for an unobstructed view is tough. Great tree, amazingly complex, like a living fractal.

Leaves

Leaves

The trail was loaded with leaves and they can be as treacherous as ice because you can’t see what’s under them: roots, rocks, holes and more. They are wonderful looking though and I had to take a picture of the pile before winter disposes of them.

Dogwood all alone

Dogwood all alone

This little dogwood tree was struggling to grow among a grove of larger trees. The contrast between its leaves and the surrounding forest was crying out for a picture. I was glad to take one.

Canon G7X on Race Brook Falls Trail

Mini waterfall on Race Brook

Mini waterfall on Race Brook

Race Brook Falls Trail, southwest Massachusetts.

Loren and I took a hike up this trail today to inspect for downed limbs and trees after the high winds the last few days. It was also an opportunity for me to try out the new Canon G7X which I got to replace the Sony RX100 III which I recently sold.

These are three untouched JPEGs straight out of the camera. All I did was crop them square. Impressive.

The Sony RX100 takes remarkable images but it’s physical ergonomics are a problem for me: flush mounted buttons, a control-by-wire front control wheel and very slow operation.

The Canon G7X is essentially the same camera done by Canon. Very similar size and shape, same 1″ sensor, nice flip up LCD for ground level shots, front control wheel with clicks (a bit too loud actually), much faster operation, better physical controls and a better menu system.

It feels much like a bigger, more capable Canon S90/95/100/110/120, etc.

I noticed that in high ISO JPEGS (no RAW converter yet) there is some smearing and this was true of the Sony RX100 (all models) as well.

It takes a while to get to know a new camera and for me the jury is still out on this one. I definitely like it better than the Sony RX100 but nothing compares with my Ricoh GR so I need to keep this camera long enough to sort that out.

Chestnut oak leaves

Chestnut oak leaves

Chestnut oak leaf

Chestnut oak leaves

Ginkgo on lotus

Ginkgo on lotus

This image is a high contrast JPEG right out of the Ricoh GR, the RAW, even with aggressive processing didn’t look as “painterly” as this so I chose this one.

Japanese Garden, Van Nuys, California. We returned to this great garden and while my 99 year old mother is mostly experiencing it through memory (she can’t walk or see well anymore) she enjoyed being wheeled around the paths.

The many ginkgo trees were shedding enough leaves so there were dried ginkgo leaves on lots of surfaces, including lotus leaves on a small pond.

Ginkgo on lotus

This image is a RAW image out of the Ricoh GR with minimal processing except to choose a monochrome preset I built in Lightroom for these kinds of shots. Lots of great texture here and the JPEG out of camera didn’t show it.

Chestnuts

American chestnut leaves

American chestnut leaves

Schaghticoke Ridge, Appalachian Trail, Kent, Connecticut.

A friend and I did the 8 mile tough hike from Bull’s Bridge to Rt. 341 in Kent on the AT.

I think one of the many reasons it went so well was that the color was spectacular and we were constantly distracted visually. However, being more into monochrome these days, I was looking for interesting contrast and I found it in these chestnut and chestnut oak leaves. Yes, the colors in these images were interesting, but to me, the textures and contrast made them even more interesting.

If I can’t get back into color photography in fall I’m not sure what will pull me back in.

Chestnut oak leaves

Chestnut oak leaves

Leaves from below

Schachticoke Ridge, on the Appalachian Trail near Thayer Brook.

I shot these on a hike with Gary a month ago. We were right next to the giant tulip trees I’ve shot many time before there. The light was such that looking straight up through low-hanging leaves back-lit the leaves creating a great effect. Focus was tough as there was a light breeze. These are the only two out of a few dozen that worked.