kent connecticut

Ice on Thayer Brook

Ice on Thayer Brook

Thayer Brook, Schaghticoke Ridge, Appalachian Trail, Kent, Connecticut.

I’ve had these images on my computer for a while; I got so many interesting images on this trip I had a tough time sorting and editing them. No doubt many reading this know of this problem.

Dave and I used micro spikes and hiked south on the AT to this great brook which has produced some of my most interesting ice images. This day it didn’t disappoint and the ice was both plentiful and unusual.

These are high contrast JPEGs out of the Ricoh GR. The raws were nice as well but I’m getting fond of the dramatic look this in-camera filter is giving these ice shots.

Many more to come from this day…

Ice on Thayer Brook

Ice on Thayer Brook

Ice on Thayer Brook

Ice on Thayer Brook

Ice on Thayer Brook

Ice on Thayer Brook

Ice on Thayer Brook

Ice on Thayer Brook

Ice stalagmites under waterfall

Thayer Brook, Schaghticoke Ridge, Appalachian Trail, Kent, Connecticut. Dave and I took a quick hike south on the AT to shoot ice on this brook. I used both the G15 and RX100 and got a few keepers from each.

These are ice drippings (stalagmites) under a waterfall and while it was tough to shoot these I think this image turned out well as it gives you a sense of the volume of the cones.

Ice hole with ripples and reflection

This was a shallow spot in the brook with holes in the ice so one could see the water running underneath, the bottom, and every now and then, an interesting reflection and/or ripple from the trees around and the rocks underneath.

Rattlesnake on Schaghticoke Ridge

Rattlesnake on Schaghticoke Ridge

 

Schaghticoke Ridge, Appalachian Trail, Kent, Connecticut. Dave and I hike this seven mile stretch of the AT a lot because it’s close to the town we live in and it’s a great section of trail that’s tough enough so it’s not all that popular with other hikers.

This section of the AT has become home to more timber rattlesnakes than any section in Connecticut and while we hike it a lot, we’ve only seen one once before.

This one was smaller, about three feet and lighter colored. Dave thought it was close to losing its skin and that’s why the color was so dull. As far as I’m concerned, a rattlesnake is a rattlesnake and this one was a few feet off the trail, close enough to strike a hiker sitting down on the rock next to it.

We only saw it by accident because there was a wild orchid a few feet away that Dave bent down to take a shot of. Good thing he saw this guy in his peripheral vision.