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Painting in the Dark

The Long Game Part 3: Painting in the Dark from Delve on Vimeo.

“Painting in the Dark: The Struggle for Art in A World Obsessed with Popularity is the long overdue follow up to the Long Game Parts 1 & 2 which looked at the creative ups and downs of Leonardo da Vinci. In this new video essay, I’ve taken a look at the forgotten difficult years of another celebrated artist and wondered what it means for creative people working today.”

This is a fantastic video essay by Adam Westbrook that uses the life and work of Vincent Van Gogh to illustrate the idea that people who are driven to create, many times do so in obscurity without much recognition to drive them during their lifetimes.

It also illustrates the messiness of a growth process: people aren’t machines, they make good and bad choices in their lives and have ups and downs. No doubt some of our greatest minds (artists, scientists, and others) have never been discovered and their ideas go to the grave with them.

Adam has made other essays leading up to this one that you should have a look at as well. His Vimeo channel is: Delve.

[via Colossal]

Later That Same Life

This is one of the most creative videos I’ve ever seen, bar none. And, it’s so simple yet so profound. Oh my, this is really good.

“56-year-old (Peter) Stoney Emshwiller is interviewed by his own 18-year-old self from the year 1977. In the late 70s teenaged Stoney Emshwiller filmed several hours of himself pretending to interview his future self. Emshwiller went on to be an actor, novelist, editor, filmmaker and artist. Recently he released a sizzle reel – still on its way to being a longer film – of his older self answering some of those questions. Poignant and funny, this concept reminds us that the closest any of us can get to time traveling is still through the magic of recorded media.”

Here’s Stoney’s pitch:

And here’s the site to help fund the project. I just contributed, it’s one of the most interesting and original projects I’ve seen in years and I’m delighted to support it.

[via Devour]

A portrait session with a twist

Planting an idea of who someone is in a portrait photographer’s head can influence how they see and shoot the person. Six portrait photographers were asked to shoot one man, each of them told a different story about who he is. This is a fascinating video made by Canon.

Petapixel has deconstructed it in their blog post, so, watch it first, then check out their post: 6 Photographers Asked to Shoot Portraits of 1 Man… With a Twist.

Two Kinds of People

João Rocha’s fun Tumbler blog: Two Kinds of People.

Core77 has a great post on both the designer and the idea of the blog: What Does the Way That You Interact With Objects Say About Your Personality?

I didn’t respond to all of them but here’s my list:

  • #034: I have a relatively clean desktop on my Mac
  • #029: I try to shoot landscape with my iPhone
  • #028: I rarely use “I’m feeling lucky”
  • #027: I store my photographs digitally and in print form
  • #026: I try to rename files I’ve downloaded so they make sense to me later
  • #025: I put ketchup on the side of fries (not on top)
  • #022: I like toilet paper over, not under
  • #021: I eat the point of the pizza first
  • #017: Over the ear, not buds
  • #016: Richard and Anne’s House (network name)
  • #015: Tabs, not new windows in browser
  • #014: Apple case on iPhone
  • #013: Watch more on HD TV/Apple TV than computer or iPad although watch on iPad on planes
  • #012: Cut sandwiches both ways although mostly perpendicular to side of bread
  • #010: Bookmarks, not dog ears
  • #009: Own automatic and stick but prefer automatic (although old enough so that wasn’t always the case)
  • #008: Break chocolate off square, no biting
  • #007: Fork although enjoy chopsticks from time to time
  • #005: Analog watch (if I had an Apple Watch it would have an analog face)
  • #004: Some iOS home screen icons have badges showing (not all)
  • #003: One alarm, no snooze
  • #001: Mixed icons and folders on iPhone and iPad

About Face

About Face

Patricia Marx at has done an incredible piece for The New Yorker on why South Korea is the world’s plastic-surgery capital.

We all want to look our best, but not since seventh grade had I been in the company of people for whom appearance mattered so much. In search of a clearer understanding of why South Koreans are such lookists, I stopped by the book-cluttered office of Eunkook Suh, a psychology professor at Yonsei University, in Seoul. “One factor is that, in contrast to Western cultures, the external aspects of self (your social status, clothes, gestures, and appearance) versus the inner aspects (thoughts and feelings) matter more here,” he explained.

I was in New York yesterday and it was loaded with tourists. As I walked across the Brooklyn Bridge I couldn’t help notice:

1. The number of people taking selfies

2. The number of vendors selling selfie sticks

I guess if you’re going to plaster selfies all over Instagram and Facebook you’d better have plastic-surgery first.