high contrast

Wide angle German architecture

Westhafen

My Flickr contact Werner Schwehm took this great wide angle architectural shot in Frankfurt, Germany with a Canon 5D III and a 12-24mm lens at 12mm (very wide angle).

The wide angle gives the image more drama than it would have had otherwise and for those who don’t know, the Canon 5D, being a full-frame camera means that 12mm is actually 12mm instead of 12mm x 1.6 (a cropped APS-C sensor) which would be 19.2mm, still wide but not as wide and dramatic. I miss having a full frame camera and a wide angle lens.

Most point and shoot cameras have smaller sensors which means achieving angles wider than 24mm is near impossible without the addition of some kind of accessory in front of the lens, sort of defeating the portability of the camera.

Even 24mm adds more drama than the 28mm of my Ricoh GR and tempts me to revisit the Sony RX100 series which has a nice zoom lens on it that goes from 24mm at f/1.8 to 70mm at f/2.8. I hate the ergonomics of the Sony (flush mounted controls, terrible menu system) but it’s a fine camera with many excellent features.

For architecture, wide angle, while it adds distortion, also adds drama and I like that.

Swamp

Swamp

Mattatuck Trail, Warren, Connecticut.

I took a hike along this new section of the Mattatuck trail that’s right in our little town. It crosses this swamp and I had to bushwhack in deep snow closer to this viewpoint through what looked to be a tick-infested jungle of branches to get this shot.

Around here Lyme disease is a real worry so going off trail in a place like this is a risk. I thought this shot might be worth the risk but having had Lyme disease I can tell you, it wasn’t. I like the shot but Lyme disease is no fun at all and if I had it to do over again, I’d have skipped this off-trail bushwhack.

Wolf tree

Wolf tree

South Egrermont, Massachusetts.

We snowshoed from Jug End east on the Appalachian Trail toward Sheffield. This large oak tree (sometimes called a “wolf tree” as it prevents other trees from growing up near it) is a thing of beauty, with some of its branches actually growing underground. There are a number of magnificent trees on this section of trail although this was the only one we had the energy to get to as the snow wasn’t great and the trail was unbroken.

We couldn’t get closer to this tree because of an electric fence. Too bad, closer framing would have been better.

Ice on the Shepaug

Ice on the Shepaug

Mattatuck Trail, Warren, Connecticut.

We hiked along the Shepaug River looking for interesting ice. We’ve had plenty of cold weather but the kind of weather that makes good ice is extreme cold, a thaw, then more extreme cold. We’ve sort of had that but not quite extreme enough in either direction (warm and cold).

I did find some nice crystals near the shore and attempted to get a shot. I could not get stable enough to get steady for sharp focus so this isn’t quite as crisp as I’d like it. Consider it a place marker for better ice in the next month (hopefully).