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Bear Rock Creek

Bear Rock Creek

Bear Rock Creek crosses the Appalachian Trail two miles north of the Connecticut/Massachusetts border in Massachusetts.

I was inspecting one of the two sections I maintain on the Appalachian Trail and since I had my new Fuji X100F with me I decided to try out its ACROS filter on the falling water on this creek.

I’m still getting used to the camera but I do like it and while it’s bigger than the others I prefer to carry on hikes, it’s possible to carry it in a padded bag on one of my pack’s shoulder straps.

These images are almost straight out of the camera; I pulled the highlights down a bit to show more detail in the white water.

Bear Rock Creek

Leaf carpet

Leaf carpet

Schaghticoke Ridge, Kent, Connecticut.

Post winter, the Appalachian Trail is, in places, covered with leaves that have remained in place since last fall through the winter. Once it snows on them and then melts, they get matted and almost stuck in place.

They’ve been walked on and broken up but not much, the trail doesn’t get as much use in winter as it does in summer. In the next three months thousands of people will walk over the 5 mile section of trail that I maintain in Connecticut (I maintain another 5 miles in Massachusetts) and the leaves will be gone; pushed off the side to continue decomposing in the woods.

Then fall will come and we’ll start all over again.

Fields along the Appalachian Trail

Desiccated Queen Anne's lace

Desiccated Queen Anne’s lace

Cornwall Bridge, Connecticut.

We took a hike south on the Appalachian Trail and it runs across a series of fields which in spring were loaded with Queen Anne’s lace (a weed). Those plants remain standing as dried out skeletons.

Field "potatoes"

Field “potatoes”

The fields we walked across next to the Appalachian Trail were farmed for many years. When farmers plow fields, they collect the rocks that come up and toss them onto walls that separate fields. This is one of those walls and these rocks came out of the field behind the rock pile. This is less a wall, more a rock pile that is well over 100 years old.

Field "potatoes"

Field “potatoes”