graphic design

Stamps from Czechoslovakia

Stamp 26

This is just a taste of some loose stamps in my collection. I have many more mounted with hinges in albums and over time I’ll be working to unmount them and get them cleaned up and scanned.

For more on how these stamps were scanned and processed check out this post.

Stamp 20

Stamp 84

Stamp 79

Stamp 49

Stamp 72//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Stamp 77

Stamps from Japan and China

Stamp 13

Japan

This is just a taste of some loose stamps in my collection. I have many more mounted with hinges in albums and over time I’ll be working to unmount them and get them cleaned up and scanned.

For more on how these stamps were scanned and processed check out this post.

Stamp 19

Japan

Stamp 44

Japan

Stamp 38

Japan

Stamp 14

China

Stamp 28

China

Stamp 42

China

Stamp 82

Taiwan (Republic of China)

Remembering Gary Burden

Gary Burden, who was part of the birth of American rock and roll in the 1960’s has passed. The New York Times has a remembrance:

Gary Burden, Designer of Famous Album Covers, Dies at 84

Here’s a fantastic video of Gary Burden being interviewed while driving up Laurel Canyon Boulevard as well as Mulholland Drive in Los Angeles.

[via Gary Sharp]

The Real Terrorist Threat

The Real Terrorist Threat

L-R, top to bottom: Kellyanne Conway, Mike Pence, Donald Trump, Sean Spicer, Stephen Miller, Stephen Bannon, Michael Flynn (resigned), and Reince Priebus.

There are many more but this has been my protest sign in the marches I’ve taken part in. I’ve heard Julia Hahn is part of the team now, a recruit from Breitbart.

Feel free to take this and use it as you like.

I’ve been sitting on my hands and not posting political statements to Flickr or my blog but the time has come for any of us who are seriously worried to get to work in any way we can to save our country.

I’ve never stopped taking pictures even though my output is low, I’m simply so upset about what’s happening in my country to focus on much else and I’ve been tossing most of the images I take. Being upset has a terrible affect on one’s creative output although for some it can stimulate it. For me it’s led to a lot of sleepless nights.

Stock up on Xanax.

Animagraffs

Animagraffs is Jacob O’Neal’s labor of love illustrating and animating how things work.

Check out his How a car engine works and don’t forget to scroll down, lots of different pieces to the animated illustrations.

This reminds me of my fascination as a kid with the acetate overlays in the World Book Encyclopedia.

And, if you always dreamed of moonwalking, check out How to Moonwalk. Brilliant. I’m working on it…

[via Kottke.org]

Paul Rand

My wife and I went to a small show at the Museum of the City of New York: Everything is Design: The Work of Paul Rand. I’ve been a fan of Paul Rand since my undergraduate days in fine arts when I’d pour through his work in Adweek annual compilations. An incredible amount of modern graphic art is standing on his shoulders.

Paul Rand is best known for iconic corporate logo designs for IBM, Westinghouse, NeXT*, UPS, ABC, and more but he did all types of design work: magazines page layout, all types of advertising, IBM Selectric typewriters, and more. He also illustrated children’s books that his wife wrote: I Know a Lot of Things and Sparkle and Spin: A Book About Words.

The Cooper Hewitt has a very nice biography with illustrations: Paul Rand, American, 1914-1996, Illustrations/Objects.

There is also a connection to the work of Charles and Ray Eames here: similar Bauhaus influence and the “modern” 1950s which was wide open to this kind of work.

*The fact that Steve Jobs paid him $100,000 for the NeXT logo and corporate ID is a legendary story.

The Noun Project

The Noun Project

A huge collection of symbols, beautifully presented and maintained. They’re all indexed and tagged for easier searching. And, they’re all either in the public domain or carry a Creative Commons license.

Many years ago I scanned and collected thousands of these symbols and indexed them in a HyperCard stack called Symbols so these images are dear to my heart.

[via Design.org]

Mail Art

In the 1980’s I was involved with an art movement that involved sending things through the worldwide postal system. The movement and the objects sent in the mail are both called Mail Art.

Remember, there was only a fledgling internet back then, no web like we have it now and the postal service was our network.

There were hundreds of mail art shows happening each year in various parts of the world and lists of them circulated in mail art "zines" (magazines) that were many times a few pieces of photocopied paper stapled together.

Those of us who took part would make a card or put a piece of art or a letter in an envelope and send it off. I was involved in many hundreds if not a thousand of these shows and I hosted my own for many years. I loved producing cards with stamps, photocopy collage and more and it was fun to send things off to places that I’d never even heard of let alone been.

Over the years that I was involved I kept a box, then two, and now many full of the mail art that found its way to me. I haven’t done a thorough sort of these boxes but because I wanted to start documenting my experience with this fascinating movement, I scanned a few interesting things.

Opening one of these boxes is like opening a time capsule on a part of my life I’ve not thought about for many years.

I decided to dig into this to take part in a project National Public Radio is putting together on the U.S. Postal Service.

Mail Art from Angela and Henning Mittendorf

Mail Art from Angela and Henning Mittendorf

Mail Art from Ryoskuke Cohen

Mail Art from Ryoskuke Cohen

Mail Art from Ryoskuke Cohen

Mail Art from Ryoskuke Cohen

Mail Art from Doc 5 cents

Mail Art from Doc 5 cents

Mail Art from Suzanne Nuttall

Mail Art from Suzanne Nuttall

Mail Art from Santa Barbara, California

Mail Art from Santa Barbara, California

Mail Art from CW Summers

Mail Art from CW Summers