Getty Center

Getty Center, various images

Getty Center tiles

The Getty Center, Los Angeles, California.

I’ve been visiting the Getty Center for sixteen years on visits to my recently passed mother. I’ve taken hundreds of images of the place. My wife, however, had never been there so we took some time to visit on our recent trip to LA.

It’s tough to remember to look down at the Getty but in fact, the floors are all made out of limestone, some of which is intricately detailed with fossils and other remnants of its earlier life as sandstone in another time.

Getty Center ceiling

One of the many things that’s great about the Getty is the juxtaposition of steel siding with stone on walls and ceilings. This alcove is one of my favorite such places.

Getty Center ivy

Richard Meier’s Getty architecture is quite stark so finding a wall of ivy there is almost a welcome relief.

Getty Center with Fuji X100S

Exterior stairs

Stairs

The Getty Center, Los Angeles, California.

I’ve been shooting architectural images of this Richard Meier masterpiece for over ten years now and it never bores me. A few years ago I had a show of images like these and it went very well; Richard Meier told me in a letter he thinks my images capture the spirit of his buildings and that put a wonderful grin on my face.

Here’s the set up on flickr (so far): Getty Center Impressions.

These new images were all shot with the Fuji X100S and processed in Lightroom like the others I’ve done in this series. While the fixed 35mm angle of view on this camera doesn’t give me the drama of 28mm or 24mm, I wanted to walk around this now very familiar place with this new camera to see how it felt. In short, it felt good and the images I got out of it rival any of the other cameras I’ve used to shoot there.

Exterior ceiling

Exterior ceiling

Corner

Corner

Facade(s)

Facade(s)

Reflection in a door

Reflection in a door

Interior

Interior

Staircase

Staircase

Railing

Railing

Tables and chairs

Tables and chairs

The Getty Center

Glass corner

The glass corner above is opaque, what you see in it is all reflection.

The Getty Center, Los Angeles, California.

I’ve been shooting architectural images of this Richard Meier masterpiece for ten years now and it never bores me. A few years ago I had a show of images like these and it went very well; Richard Meier told me in a letter he thinks my images capture the spirit of his buildings and that put the a wonderful grin on my face.

Much of the ten years of shooting was with a Canon 5D and either a Canon 24-70mm f/2.8 or a 16-35mm f/2.8 lens, a kit that can get heavy when walking around a space like this for a few hours. Last year I walked through the Getty Center with a Sony RX100 and it was a revelation: the images it produced were excellent and in many ways rivaled the DSLR kit. Obviously some of this is me learning how to shoot these buildings and learning how to process the images in Lightroom but some of it is the sensor and lens combinations used to record the images.

So, today I decided to try the Ricoh GR to make many of the same images and it did not disappoint. There’s plenty of detail, metering was fine with a white facade, a dark blue sky with white clouds on a very bright sunny day and even with auto ISO on the camera stuck at ISO 100 and there was very little noise in the shadows. No noise reduction was needed for these images.

I have yet to get home and print these and for me, that’s the ultimate test but for the time being I could not be happier with this camera. The lack of an anti-aliasing filter didn’t seem to cause problems here as far as I can see although these shots may not be the best test of that feature/liability.

If you’ve not been to The Getty Center, it’s worth a trip to LA (a place I can’t stand) to visit; it’s truly a masterpiece.

Glass corner

The glass corner above is opaque, what you see in it is all reflection.

Curved exterior

Curved exterior

Narrow walkway

Exterior stairs

Entrance rotunda

Entrance rotunda

Flowers in the Getty Center Garden

Flower in the Getty Center Garden

The Getty Center, Los Angeles, California. I wanted to get back to the Getty with my Ricoh GR (which lacks an anti-aliasing filter over its sensor) to take some architectural pictures looking for moire. And, I took quite a few which I’ll process later today or when i get back home.

My mother enjoys wheeling through the Robert Irwin-designed garden labyrinth so we got down there as well and I took a few flower pictures with the GR. I must say, I’m quite happy with it as a general purpose camera and these images are pretty much straight out of the camera. I’m having a bit of trouble remembering to turn macro mode off; unlike other cameras I’ve used it stays on even when the camera is turned off. This is good, I just have to retrain myself. And, the camera hunts in macro mode occasionally as well which will take some work to figure out how to avoid. But, my issues with this camera are mostly issues with myself, not the camera itself and I’m extremely pleased with its ease of use and the images it pumps out effortlessly.

The architectural shots look great to me as well and I’ll get on them soon.

Flower in the Getty Center Garden

Return to the Getty Center with small cameras

Getty Center glass facade

Canon EOS M

The Getty Center, Los Angeles, California. As some of you know I’ve been taking images of Richard Meier’s architecture at the Getty for over eight years now, almost all with a Canon 5D and a variety of high end zoom lenses.

On this trip I had a Sony RX100 (which I now own) and a rented Canon EOS M with a Canon EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 lens and I took a variety of images attempting to capture things similar to what I’d done with a DSLR. I must say, I was impressed with the way both cameras worked; the image quality on the little RX100 is superb as it is on the EOS M with it’s APS-C sized sensor. My only complaint about the EOS M is that I was taking pictures accidentally as its touch screen bumped around on my chest. No doubt a simple menu adjustment would have prevented this. Its slow auto focus was never an issue with this type of photography and it locked in quite well, very few out of focus images.

Would a Canon 5D Mark III and EF 24-70mm f/2.8 L II have done a better job? No doubt, but the cost and weight of such a rig is staggering compared to either or both of these smaller cameras.

Compare these image to others in the set, I think you’ll be amazed at how well the two smaller cameras did. Getty Center Abstractions set

Getty Center rotunda interior

Canon EOS M

Getty Center interior

Canon EOS M

Getty Center stairs

Canon EOS M

Getty Center exterior

Canon EOS M

Getty Center exterior

Sony RX100

Getty Center stairs

Sony RX100

Getty Center post and stairs

Sony RX100

Getty Center staircase

Getty Center staircase

The Getty Center, Los Angeles, California. As some of you know I’ve been taking images of Richard Meier’s architecture at the Getty for over eight years now, almost all with a Canon 5D and a variety of high end zoom lenses. Today I had my Canon Powershot S100 and a rented Sony RX100 and I took a variety of images attempting to capture things similar to what I’d done with a DSLR. I must say, I was impressed with the way both cameras worked and while I’m not a big fan of Sony’s ergonomics, the image quality on this little RX100 is superb.

Compare this image to others in the set, I think you’ll be amazed at how well the point and shoot did.

Getty Center Impressions set

Ray K. Metzker and the Institute of Design

The Getty Center is having a show: The Photographs of Ray K. Metzker and the Institute of Design which I just saw and highly recommend.

One of my favorite photographers and artists, Frederick Sommer was represented in the show. Not this image, which was from a show at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York but similar work done at the Institute of Design in Chicago where many of the folks in this show worked.

Frederick Sommer

More Getty Center Abstractions

Getty Center Abstraction

This series of images was taken on visits to the Getty Center in Los Angeles, California over an eight year period.

I usually find this type of modern architecture sterile, but here the architect Richard Meier created spaces that are not only pleasant to be in but include interesting lines, windows, angles, curves, and textures in almost every view. Looking abstractly at these details reveals patterns that capture my eye as a photographer, and as many visual artists know, once you notice something like this, it’s hard to let go of it. I continue to visit the Getty and add to this collection.

Here’s the entire set so far: Getty Center Abstractions

I have a show of these images coming up next month. If you’re in the area stop by.

Getty Center Abstractions
Photographs by Richard Wanderman

Opening Saturday, January 7, 3:30 – 5:30 pm
Artist’s talk: 3:45 pm followed by reception

January 7 – April 14, 2012
Gallery Hours: Monday – Saturday, 10 am – 4 pm

Marie Louise Trichet Art Gallery
Wisdom House
229 East Litchfield Rd.
Litchfield, CT 06759
860-567-3163
www.wisdomhouse.org

Getty Center Abstraction

Getty Center Abstraction

Getty Center Abstraction

Getty Center Abstraction

Getty Center Abstraction

More Getty Center Abstractions

Getty Center Abstraction

This series of images was taken on visits to the Getty Center in Los Angeles, California over an eight year period.

I usually find this type of modern architecture sterile, but here the architect Richard Meier created spaces that are not only pleasant to be in but include interesting lines, windows, angles, curves, and textures in almost every view. Looking abstractly at these details reveals patterns that capture my eye as a photographer, and as many visual artists know, once you notice something like this, it’s hard to let go of it. I continue to visit the Getty and add to this collection.

Here’s the entire set so far: Getty Center Abstractions

Getty Center Abstraction

Getty Center Abstraction

Getty Center Abstraction

Getty Center Abstraction

Getty Center Abstractions Show

Getty Center abstraction

I never posted the “official” show announcement for the show I have coming up. Here it is for those of you who might be close enough to come. I’ve been printing and framing and getting the images together and I must say I’m pleased.

Getty Center Abstractions
Photographs by Richard Wanderman

Opening Saturday, January 7, 3:30 – 5:30 pm
Artist’s talk: 3:45 pm followed by reception

January 7 – April 14, 2012
Gallery Hours: Monday – Saturday, 10 am – 4 pm

Marie Louise Trichet Art Gallery
Wisdom House
229 East Litchfield Rd.
Litchfield, CT 06759
860-567-3163
www.wisdomhouse.org