Canon G7X

Swamp in fog

Swamp in fog

Kent, Connecticut.

I was over at my friend Joy Brown’s house helping her sort some slides to send off to get scanned and on my way home I noticed the fog was thick on the swamp that her long driveway runs by. I stopped the truck and pulled out the camera and took numerous images. About 100′ out the swamp just disappears into fog. It was quite amazing and the fog was so thick the drive home was no fun. Nice to see some good images came of it though.

Snowy egret

Snowy egret

Japanese Garden, Van Nuys, California.

It was a big bird day at the Japanese Garden: Canadian geese, Egyptian geese, various kinds of ducks, cormorants, and a number of snowy egrets.

As we were leaving I was able to take a number of shots of this snowy egret as he/she was fishing.

I enjoyed using the Canon G7X quite a bit: the tilting LCD made this shot easy, the longer zoom range (than the Sony RX100) allowed me to get closer to the bird, and the front control wheel’s clicks made zooming faster and easier than with the Sony. The white bird was a bit blown out but I’m not sure the Sony’s similar sensor wouldn’t have done the same thing. The Canon is a much sturdier camera with better ergonomics and even if it’s not as popular, I like it better than the Sony, which I found tough to use both in winter with gloves and all the time because it’s so slow to respond.

Warped reflections in Bee Brook

Warped reflections in Bee Brook

Macricostas Preserve, Washington, Connecticut.

Took a short hike in slush in this nature preserve down the road from our house and one of my favorite brooks is now free of ice. Got to try out the tilting LCD on the Canon G7X which (along with the Sony RX100) is perfect for shots like this.

Too much of a water fall and you get foam and splashing, but a little drop over rocks will warp a reflection nicely giving it the “Grateful Dead effect*.

*The LSD equivalent of the “Ken Burns effect” (panning and zooming a still image to make it less static).

Thayer Brook in fall

Tulip trees

Tulip trees

Schaghticoke Ridge, Appalachian Trail, south of Kent, Connecticut.

I took a quick hike up to Thayer Brook this afternoon and took along the Canon G7X to try out. Nice day for hiking although a bit too bright for my taste in shooting.

I’ve shot these enormous tulip trees before and it’s sort of a test for any camera I’ve got. The tilt out LCD on the G7X makes this kind of shot a breeze. The trees ended up a bit under exposed but I got them sorted in Lightroom. All in all, the camera did a nice job here.

Waterfall on Thayer Brook

Waterfall on Thayer Brook

Falling water in bright light is a challenge. I’m not into attempting to “sheet” the water with a neutral density filter although I do like a bit of blur to show motion. Aside from the blown highlights (maybe my problem with metering) I’m happy with this shot and there’s plenty of saturation in the leaves and rocks. Canon colors pop and I’ve not seen this in a while. Not sure what I think but it does seem like I can work with this camera and fine tune things.

Mini waterfall on Thayer Brook

Mini waterfall on Thayer Brook

This shot seems unspectacular until you look closer at the moss hanging off the rocks. The G7X’s sensor picks up a lot of detail and one I figure out how to use it more effectively I think I can improve on these kinds of shots.

Canon G7X on Race Brook Falls Trail

Mini waterfall on Race Brook

Mini waterfall on Race Brook

Race Brook Falls Trail, southwest Massachusetts.

Loren and I took a hike up this trail today to inspect for downed limbs and trees after the high winds the last few days. It was also an opportunity for me to try out the new Canon G7X which I got to replace the Sony RX100 III which I recently sold.

These are three untouched JPEGs straight out of the camera. All I did was crop them square. Impressive.

The Sony RX100 takes remarkable images but it’s physical ergonomics are a problem for me: flush mounted buttons, a control-by-wire front control wheel and very slow operation.

The Canon G7X is essentially the same camera done by Canon. Very similar size and shape, same 1″ sensor, nice flip up LCD for ground level shots, front control wheel with clicks (a bit too loud actually), much faster operation, better physical controls and a better menu system.

It feels much like a bigger, more capable Canon S90/95/100/110/120, etc.

I noticed that in high ISO JPEGS (no RAW converter yet) there is some smearing and this was true of the Sony RX100 (all models) as well.

It takes a while to get to know a new camera and for me the jury is still out on this one. I definitely like it better than the Sony RX100 but nothing compares with my Ricoh GR so I need to keep this camera long enough to sort that out.

Chestnut oak leaves

Chestnut oak leaves

Chestnut oak leaf

Chestnut oak leaves