Video

Two Nineteen Forty Four

Two Nineteen Forty Four from Tristan Greszko on Vimeo.

Brad Gobright and Jim Reynolds setting a speed record for climbing the Nose route on El Capitan in Yosemite Valley. They climbed it in 2 hours, 19 minutes, and 44 seconds.

To me, speed records seem insane but hey, I’m an old fart who climbed in traditional ways. But, this video is well worth watching because it’s a great piece of work in itself, documenting an amazing achievement.

[via PetaPixel]

Inside Out

French photographer JR who I posted about in 2008 with his Women are Heroes Project has since received a TED Prize and gone on to a new project called “Inside Out” which the video above documents.

I’m curious about the printing process: it’s very fast, low resolution monochrome, and on thin paper. It would be fun to have a printer like that to make wrapping paper.

[via Uncrate]

How to Make 29 Handmade Pasta Shapes With 4 Types of Dough

Luca D’Onofrio shows us how to make various kinds of pasta. Absolutely incredible, not just his skill, but how well this piece is produced. Notice the video overlays.

Yes, it’s like watching This Old House and knowing you probably won’t be able to use tools like that and they make everything look easy, but, this definitely makes me want to get into pasta making to go along with my bread making.

[via The Kid Should See This]

Remembering Gary Burden

Gary Burden, who was part of the birth of American rock and roll in the 1960’s has passed. The New York Times has a remembrance:

Gary Burden, Designer of Famous Album Covers, Dies at 84

Here’s a fantastic video of Gary Burden being interviewed while driving up Laurel Canyon Boulevard as well as Mulholland Drive in Los Angeles.

[via Gary Sharp]

Surgical Resident Breaks Down 49 Medical Scenes From Film & TV

“Annie Onishi, general surgery resident at Columbia University, takes a look at emergency room and operating room scenes from a variety of television shows and movies and breaks down how accurate they really are. Would the adrenaline scene from Pulp Fiction actually play out that way? Is all that medical jargon we hear in shows like Grey’s Anatomy and House true-to-life? Is removing a bullet really a cure-all for a gunshot wound?”

She did this in conjunction with WIRED magazine.

This is brilliant, very well done. I was hoping she’d comment on the William Hurt movie, The Doctor (operating room music, among other things) and the Harrison Ford movie The Fugitive where there’s behind the scenes fraud going on to inflate the effects of a drug.

[via Kottke.org]