Process

The sound that connects Stravinsky to Bruno Mars

This is an incredible short documentary by VOX on one of the first sampled sounds (the orchestra hit) which happened to be a concert of Igor Stravinsky’s Firebird Suite and how it’s been used ever since in rock, rap, and everything in between. This is an incredible story and history.

[via Uncrate]

Dollar Street

This is an incredible TED Talk on how families live in different parts of the world at various socio-economic levels. A brilliant study.

What does it look like when someone in Sweden brushes their teeth or when someone in Rwanda makes their bed? Anna Rosling Rönnlund wants all of us to find out, so she sent photographers to 264 homes in 50 countries (and counting!) to document the stoves, bed, toilets, toys and more in households from every income bracket around the world. See how families live in Latvia or Burkina Faso or Peru as Rosling Rönnlund explains the power of data visualization to help us better understand the world.

Here’s the actual site for you to mess around with: Dollar Street.

[via Kottke.org]

Inside Out

French photographer JR who I posted about in 2008 with his Women are Heroes Project has since received a TED Prize and gone on to a new project called “Inside Out” which the video above documents.

I’m curious about the printing process: it’s very fast, low resolution monochrome, and on thin paper. It would be fun to have a printer like that to make wrapping paper.

[via Uncrate]

How to Make 29 Handmade Pasta Shapes With 4 Types of Dough

Luca D’Onofrio shows us how to make various kinds of pasta. Absolutely incredible, not just his skill, but how well this piece is produced. Notice the video overlays.

Yes, it’s like watching This Old House and knowing you probably won’t be able to use tools like that and they make everything look easy, but, this definitely makes me want to get into pasta making to go along with my bread making.

[via The Kid Should See This]

More on the Facebook/Cambridge Analytica scandal

Here’s some more discussion of the Facebook/ Cambridge Analytica scandal I’ve read in the past few days that I think adds to our understanding of it.

I’m posting these links less as political commentary on the Trump campaign and the Mercers and Bannon’s underwriting this data scrape, more for those of you reading who are Facebook users and/or serious social networkers who are trying to wrap your heads around the significance of what’s happened here.

Alvin Chang at VOX:The Facebook and Cambridge Analytica scandal, explained with a simple diagram.

Zeynep Tufekci in an op/ed for the New York Times (recommended by Bruce SchneirFacebook’s Surveillance Machine.

Adrian Chen, Nathan Heller, Andrew Marantz, and Anna Weiner (at The New Yorker): Discussion: How to Fix Facebook.

Update
How Facebook Groups Are Being Exploited To Spread Misinformation, Plan Harassment, And Radicalize People.

Cambridge Analytica’s “psychographic microtargeting”: what’s bullshit and what’s legit.

How Cambridge Analytica used Facebook to find out who you are

How Cambridge Analytica used Facebook to find out who you are

No doubt you know all about this and other Facebook data scrapes and breaches by now but this cartoon explanation, by Eleri Harris and Andy Warner at The Nib is a useful explainer.

Note: I had an early Facebook account but dumped it after a year as I didn’t particularly like the Facebook design and found it less than useful. When Facebook bought Instagram I dumped that too. To me, there’s something questionable about social tools that attempt to pull people in by appealing to their desire to become more popular. Yes, I realize that Facebook and Instagram are more than that, but these (popularity) tools are deeply engrained in their designs. What people will do to become and remain popular is bothersome to me. Flickr does this and I ranted about it a number of years ago: Flickr Explore.

Of course, WordPress (this site) does this as well… Sigh.