Hiking

Macricostas field

Storm coming

Macricostas Preserve, Washington, Connecticut.

An old friend who hasn’t been on snowshoes in many years and I took a lap around this big field. What looked like a fast approaching storm ended up being nothing. Great to be out though and snowshoeing is a lot of fun.

This image is looking west, the next one is looking back this way from the other side of the field.

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Next time we’ll go up the hill at the back of this image. My wife and I broke the trail up and over it a few days ago. The back-left of the hill is called “Waramaug Rock” and it looks out over Lake Waramaug which is about 3/4 mile to the left edge of this image.

This image is looking east, the previous one is looking back this way from the other side of the field.

Fields along the Appalachian Trail

Desiccated Queen Anne's lace

Desiccated Queen Anne’s lace

Cornwall Bridge, Connecticut.

We took a hike south on the Appalachian Trail and it runs across a series of fields which in spring were loaded with Queen Anne’s lace (a weed). Those plants remain standing as dried out skeletons.

Field "potatoes"

Field “potatoes”

The fields we walked across next to the Appalachian Trail were farmed for many years. When farmers plow fields, they collect the rocks that come up and toss them onto walls that separate fields. This is one of those walls and these rocks came out of the field behind the rock pile. This is less a wall, more a rock pile that is well over 100 years old.

Field "potatoes"

Field “potatoes”

Cedar bark

Cedar bark

Steep Rock Preserve, Washington, Connecticut.

We took a short walk along the Shepaug River, attempting to avoid ice and finally gave up and called it quits. Without spikes on hiking boots it’s nearly impossible to walk on the trails around here right now.

There’s a large cedar tree in the parking area and its bark is amazing so I took a few shots near the ground. This tree is at least 100 years old, maybe older.

Cedar bark

Koya Bound

Koya Bound

“Koya-san — home to esoteric Buddhism — is the name of a sacred basin eight hundred meters high and surrounded by eight mountains. It is roughly one hundred kilometers of trails north from the Kumano Hongu Taisha shrine in Wakayama, Japan. Though the name of the basin is often incorrectly translated as Mt. Koya in English, Mt. Koya is only one of the eight peaks, and is remote from the central cluster of temples.

We walked towards Koya-san, but we did not touch Mt. Koya.”

Koya Bound is a journal of an eight day walk on the Kumano Kodo trail in Japan by Craig Mod and Dan Rubin. The photography, the website structure and the writing are all superb. As you scroll down and back up the page the map shows your progress along the trail.

It’s also a limited edition book that’s available via a link at the bottom of the site.

[via Jon Moss]

Ice, grass, snow

Ice, grass, snow

Macricostas Preserve, Washington, Connecticut.

Tom and I took a quick walk around an old corn field and there were a few spots that were frozen enough to show interest. The snow was very light so we could see through to the grass and the ice, grass, and snow made a great pattern.

I had to crop this to get some leaves out of it that I thought might be interesting but in the end, weren’t.