Hiking

Swamp reflection

Swamp reflection

Appalachian Trail, Merwinsville, Connecticut.

We hiked the first section of the AT in Connecticut (over Ten Mile Hill) and this swamp is right off Route 55. It always seems messy and uninteresting until you look closer and then interesting photographic possibilities open up.

This image was processed with Apple’s Photos application in macOS Sierra. This version of Photos isn’t very good and I’m no expert on using it but the Photos upgrade coming in the next MacOS update (High Sierra) looks excellent and I’m hoping its good enough at doing what I like so that I can move away from Adobe Lightroom. Lightroom is a great application that I’ve used since it came out but Adobe is moving away from stand-alone desktop applications and I don’t want to subscribe to Adobe Creative Cloud. Time will tell…

Old birch tree

Old birch tree

Macricostas Preserve, Washington, Connecticut.

We took a short walk up to Waramaug Rock and around the Macricostas loop trail. I knew I’d shot this tree before but I was inspired by an image I saw here on Flickr this morning from Fuzzy Messed Up Panda:

www.flickr.com/photos/tessl8d/34123474264/in/dateposted/

Mine doesn’t have the great bokeh his does but I gave it my best shot, so to speak.

Bear Rock Creek

Bear Rock Creek

Bear Rock Creek crosses the Appalachian Trail two miles north of the Connecticut/Massachusetts border in Massachusetts.

I was inspecting one of the two sections I maintain on the Appalachian Trail and since I had my new Fuji X100F with me I decided to try out its ACROS filter on the falling water on this creek.

I’m still getting used to the camera but I do like it and while it’s bigger than the others I prefer to carry on hikes, it’s possible to carry it in a padded bag on one of my pack’s shoulder straps.

These images are almost straight out of the camera; I pulled the highlights down a bit to show more detail in the white water.

Bear Rock Creek

Leaf carpet

Leaf carpet

Schaghticoke Ridge, Kent, Connecticut.

Post winter, the Appalachian Trail is, in places, covered with leaves that have remained in place since last fall through the winter. Once it snows on them and then melts, they get matted and almost stuck in place.

They’ve been walked on and broken up but not much, the trail doesn’t get as much use in winter as it does in summer. In the next three months thousands of people will walk over the 5 mile section of trail that I maintain in Connecticut (I maintain another 5 miles in Massachusetts) and the leaves will be gone; pushed off the side to continue decomposing in the woods.

Then fall will come and we’ll start all over again.

Ice on the Mattatuck Trail

Ice on the Mattatuck Trail

Mattatuck Trail, Warren, Connecticut.

This ice is on a small stream feeding into the Shepaug River. The stream doesn’t have a steep grade and this is part of what makes interesting ice formations (slow moving water).

I took too many images during the hour I spent here and many weren’t in focus although with ice it’s tough to sort that out. This collection is a cross section of the different types of crystallization I found that day.

Me looking at ice on the Mattatuck Trail

Me looking at ice on the Mattatuck Trail

Ice on the Mattatuck Trail

Ice on the Mattatuck Trail

Ice on the Mattatuck Trail

Ice on the Mattatuck Trail

Ice on the Mattatuck Trail

Ice on the Mattatuck Trail

Ice on the Mattatuck Trail

Ice on the Mattatuck Trail

Ice on the Mattatuck Trail

Mattatuck Trail, Warren, Connecticut.

I usually shoot both RAW and JPEG with my Ricoh GR II and the JPEGs are this high contrast black and white with grain. For the most part I use the JPEGs in Lightroom as a guide for my RAW processing.

This day I somehow had my camera set to make a single file, the high contrast JPEG file. So, these are straight out of the camera and a bit more contrasty and grainy than my usual. I like the images and decided to post them anyway. I have a few hundreds more I did a week later but have yet to process them all yet.

These were shot in a small streamlet that we crossed over with snowshoes. It was a fun day and this is a great new trail for us, very close to our house.

Ice on the Mattatuck Trail

Ice on the Mattatuck Trail

Ice on the Mattatuck Trail

Stream ice

Warren, Connecticut.

We’ve been hiking a new trail near our house called the Mattatuck trail. Just north of the Shepaug Reservoir a small stream runs into the Shepaug River and its low angle and slow enough that in our recent cold snap it developed a lot of great ice formations.

I shot over 100 still images on this small stream but also decided to experiment with video on my iPhone. I’m new at this and so, my panning skills aren’t great but these short videos will give you a taste of what it’s like on this small stream.

I’m pretty sure the bird in the background is a crow that was annoyed at our presence.

I spent an hour rock hopping up about 50 yards on this stream, taking pictures and making these crude videos. It was great.

Consider zooming them out; there should be enough resolution for most screens.