Collections

Stamps from Czechoslovakia

Stamp 26

This is just a taste of some loose stamps in my collection. I have many more mounted with hinges in albums and over time I’ll be working to unmount them and get them cleaned up and scanned.

For more on how these stamps were scanned and processed check out this post.

Stamp 20

Stamp 84

Stamp 79

Stamp 49

Stamp 72//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Stamp 77

Stamps from Japan and China

Stamp 13

Japan

This is just a taste of some loose stamps in my collection. I have many more mounted with hinges in albums and over time I’ll be working to unmount them and get them cleaned up and scanned.

For more on how these stamps were scanned and processed check out this post.

Stamp 19

Japan

Stamp 44

Japan

Stamp 38

Japan

Stamp 14

China

Stamp 28

China

Stamp 42

China

Stamp 82

Taiwan (Republic of China)

Scanned postcards of early 20th Century America

These picture postcards capture the monumental scale of America in the early 20th century

Rian Dundon, editor at Timeline has put together a fantastic collection of scanned postcards of things like the Flatiron Building under construction in 1902 to a scene of Market Street in San Francisco after the earthquake in 1906. It’s an amazing collection.

I recommend zooming it out, the images are high resolution and scale up well.

Two Kinds of People

João Rocha’s fun Tumbler blog: Two Kinds of People.

Core77 has a great post on both the designer and the idea of the blog: What Does the Way That You Interact With Objects Say About Your Personality?

I didn’t respond to all of them but here’s my list:

  • #034: I have a relatively clean desktop on my Mac
  • #029: I try to shoot landscape with my iPhone
  • #028: I rarely use “I’m feeling lucky”
  • #027: I store my photographs digitally and in print form
  • #026: I try to rename files I’ve downloaded so they make sense to me later
  • #025: I put ketchup on the side of fries (not on top)
  • #022: I like toilet paper over, not under
  • #021: I eat the point of the pizza first
  • #017: Over the ear, not buds
  • #016: Richard and Anne’s House (network name)
  • #015: Tabs, not new windows in browser
  • #014: Apple case on iPhone
  • #013: Watch more on HD TV/Apple TV than computer or iPad although watch on iPad on planes
  • #012: Cut sandwiches both ways although mostly perpendicular to side of bread
  • #010: Bookmarks, not dog ears
  • #009: Own automatic and stick but prefer automatic (although old enough so that wasn’t always the case)
  • #008: Break chocolate off square, no biting
  • #007: Fork although enjoy chopsticks from time to time
  • #005: Analog watch (if I had an Apple Watch it would have an analog face)
  • #004: Some iOS home screen icons have badges showing (not all)
  • #003: One alarm, no snooze
  • #001: Mixed icons and folders on iPhone and iPad

Flickr Commons, participating institutions

Flickr Commons Participating Institutions

It started with The Library of Congress in June, 2007 and has grown considerably since then.

The key goal of The Commons is to share hidden treasures from the world’s public photography archives.

And they’re doing just that.

I could have posted a lot of stuff here but I hope anyone who reads this will follow the links and poke around. If you have a blog, all of these images are easily embedded. I like to give some context when I use things like this but it’s not always possible.

Have fun.

Walt Whitman, ca. 1860 - ca. 1865

Walt Whitman, image by Mathew Brady, 1865

From Flickr member The U.S. National Archives.

Rear end of Bridal Veil mill

Rear end of Bridal Veil mill from hotel. Palmer, Oregon. 1910

From Flickr member The Field Museum Library.

Group photograph captioned 'Hungarian Gypsies all of whom we...

Hungarian Gypsies coming into Ellis Island, 1905

Ruth St Denis in a Burmese solo dance.

Ruth St Denis in a Burmese solo dance, 1923

From Flickr member New York Public Library

Överenhörna Church, Södermanland, Sweden

Överenhörna Church, Södermanland, Sweden, 1905

Evertsberg Chapel, Dalarna, Sweden

Evertsberg Chapel, Dalarna, Sweden, 1900

From Flickr member Swedish National Heritage Board

Dave Barry Quotations

I’ve been collecting quotations for years and figured I’d put my collections online for others to use as they wish. Enjoy these quotations, use the comment form to share any quotations by Dave Barry you don’t find here.

More on Dave Barry: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Barry

Men, because of a tragic genetic flaw, cannot see dirt until there is enough of it to support agriculture.
– Dave Barry

It is better to be rich and healthy than poor and sick.
– Dave Barry

When I heated my home with oil, I used an average of 800 gallons a year. I have found that I can keep comfortably warm for an entire winter with slightly over half that quantity of beer.
– Dave Barry

Without question, the greatest invention in the history of mankind is beer. Oh, I grant you that the wheel was also a fine invention, but the wheel does not go nearly as well with pizza.
– Dave Barry

Not all chemicals are bad. Without chemicals such as hydrogen and oxygen, for example, there would be no way to make water, a vital ingredient in beer.
– Dave Barry

Americans who travel abroad for the first time are often shocked to discover that, despite all the progress that has been made in the last 30 years, many foreign people still speak in foreign languages.
– Dave Barry

Recently I began to feel this void in my life, even after meals, and I said to myself, ‘Dave, all you do with your spare time is sit around and drink beer. You need a hobby.’ So I got a hobby. I make beer.
– Dave Barry

I like beer. On occasion, I will even drink beer to celebrate a major event such as the fall of communism or the fact that the refrigerator is still working.
– Dave Barry

Although golf was originally restricted to wealthy, overweight Protestants, today it’s open to anybody who owns hideous clothing.
– Dave Barry

American business long ago gave up on demanding that prospective employees be honest and hardworking. It has even stopped hoping for employees who are educated enough that they can tell the difference between the men’s room and the women’s room without having little pictures on the doors.
– Dave Barry

As a professional journalist, I have always been fascinated by people who appear to have even more spare time than I do.
– Dave Barry

Basically, the American businessman should dress as though he recently lost his entire family in a tragic boat explosion.
– Dave Barry

If a woman has to choose between catching a fly ball and saving an infant’s life, she will choose to save the infant’s life without even considering if there are men on base.
– Dave Barry

Karate is a form of martial arts in which people who have had years and years of training can, using only their hands and feet, make some of the worst movies in the history of the world.
– Dave Barry

Never tell a woman that you didn’t realize she was pregnant unless you’re certain that she is.
– Dave Barry

Eastern European matchbox labels

german matchbox label

Flickr member Jane McDevitt is a phillumenist which means she collects (and scans) matchbox labels. Her collection of matchbox labels from eastern Europe is one of the finest I’ve ever seen. Incredible stuff and reminiscent of Russian constructivist art. Scanning through the entire thing is like a graphical history lesson. I collect as well but haven’t started the process of scanning yet. It’s a big job…

german matchbox label

czechoslovakian matchbox label

polish matchbox label

polish matchbox label

czechoslovakian matchbox label

What I’m doing about RSS

With the demise of Google Reader on July 1st there’s a mad scramble to corral the users who are going to be cast adrift when they no longer have a stable cloud based RSS feed home.

As I said in an earlier post on this, for me, readability is at the top of the list of attributes of the application(s) I use to scan feeds. For many years, the Reeder app on Mac, iPad, and iPhone was my primary way to collect, organize, and read everything from personal blogs to various news services to flickr photo streams and more. RSS as a technology and Reeder as a tool to harness it has made reading, an activity that comes hard to me, much easier.

But, the various Reeder apps are not going to be ready to sync with a cloud service and with each other by Monday. Only the latest Reeder for iPhone is going to work with a few of the various cloud services out there but Reeder for iPad and Mac won’t (yet).

Many will feel differently about this but in my case, my MacBook Pro is my primary device for using Reeder, dealing with this blog, and more. I like a real keyboard and a mouse and the various services that Mac OS provides me (vs iOS). So, for me, the primary tool I’m interested in is an RSS reader on my Mac. My iPhone and iPad, while heavily used, come second.

So Reeder is on hold for the time being because the Macintosh version can’t self-host feeds and it won’t work with any of the ongoing cloud based services. As I said in my earlier posts on this, I don’t really care about Google Reader but I really do care about Reeder because that’s the tool I interact with and it gives me no joy to pull it off my Mac’s dock.

Mr. Reader looks like an excellent app for the iPad and it will work with various cloud hosting services. But, it doesn’t have a Mac or iPhone version.

I made an account with Feedly and imported all of my Google Reader feeds, moved over to Feedly in the cloud and turned off the old Feedly Safari extension. I downloaded Feedly for iPhone and iPad and got everything all hooked up. Feedly is working for me, but, I’m not crazy about it because there is no native Mac app (it’s a web app on the computer) and it’s more magazine like than I prefer, even when customized to get the most list-like views out of it. I’m using Feedly as my backup tool and cloud service, hoping that maybe someday Reeder will sync with it.

My very first RSS Reader was an early version of NetNewsWire and I stuck with it for many years until Brent Simmons sold it and at about the same time, Google Reader came along and I switched to it and then later, Reeder.

I decided to give NetNewsWire another try a few days ago and it’s on sale for the moment for $10 so it’s not an expensive experiment. I must say, I’m enjoying using it. Very similar to Reeder with a simple interface and simple controls and decent (and adjustable) typography. At the moment it doesn’t sync with anything but it does hold onto all of your feeds and you can import your Google Reader account with all folders and feeds intact. If you’re not sure what to do and you’re a serious Mac user, I highly recommend buying NetNewsWire and getting your feeds out of Google Reader. This way you’ve saved all of your feeds and any structure you have for reading them and you can wait out the syncing issue and iOS app issue.

If I find myself in a place where I need to see my feeds and can only do it on my iPhone, I’ve got Feedly running and can always dig through feeds to find what I want. But, for now, my primary way of reading

In the end, I’m hoping that Reeder is brought back to life with various possibilities for syncing via the cloud but until then, after a struggle testing a lot of solutions the past few weeks, I think I’ve found a collection of tools that will make this transition tolerable.

Gary Baseman: Unmasked

This is a wonderful look into the life (and house) of artist Gary Baseman. I’ve been following his graphical work for many years and no doubt some seeing this will recognize certain characters from illustration work he’s done for alternative and mainstream magazines.

The retrospective he’s talking about will be at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles April 25th through August 18th. I’m in Los Angeles as I post this but I’ll miss it on this trip. Next trip in May I hope to see this show.

Gary Baseman’s officlal site
Gary Baseman on wikipedia