Art

Joy Brown on Broadway

Figures on a flatbed

Figures on a flatbed

Broadway, New York City.

My good friend Joy Brown has been making large bronze castings of her ceramic sculpture and is having a show of them in New York City. Joy has been traveling to China to work with a foundry there for many years and these finished pieces were shipped to the US in a large container by ship and arrived a few weeks ago. There will be a sister show in China opening in a few months.

Forklift on Broadway

Forklift on Broadway

Thinker in crosswalk

We pulled an all-nighter last night helping with the installation which was done by a great outfit out of Bethel, Connecticut: Mariano Brothers.

We started at 10:00 pm and finished at 3:00 am. There were two flatbed trucks, ours with four pieces starting at 72nd St. and working north, the other starting at 168th St. and working south.

Mother and child at 72nd St.

Mother and child at 72nd St.

Many of Joy’s friends came from all over the country and they were joined by a crowd of curious and supportive New Yorkers. It was quite a scene although after midnight as we moved up town only the core group remained.

Tomorrow, Wednesday May 17th there will be a formal “opening” at 11:00 am at the 72nd St and Broadway installation. The show will be up for at least six months, maybe longer. Each setting has a map showing the location of each of the sculptures. It’s a bit of a hike to walk the whole thing but there’s a subway line running under Broadway and the pieces are near enough to stops so they can be easily gotten to.

I’m pooped!

#joybrownonbroadway

The mathematics of sidewalk illusions

Brilliant, the best explaination of this I’ve ever seen.

“Have you ever come across an oddly stretched image on the sidewalk, only to find that it looks remarkably realistic if you stand in exactly the right spot? These sidewalk illusions employ a technique called anamorphosis — a special case of perspective art where artists represent 3D views on 2D surfaces. So how is it done? Fumiko Futamura traces the history and mathematics of perspective.”

[via The Kid Should See This]

Gary Greff’s large scale sculpture

Incredible work. Incredible story.

“With zero experience welding or creating art, Gary Greff began building the world’s largest metal sculptures and placing them along the “Enchanted Highway,” or Highway 21 in Regent, North Dakota.

By 2006, Greff had completed a total of seven mammoth sculptures for the 32-mile stretch of road. All are thematically related to the western North Dakota’s cultural and historical roots. For instance, in one sculpture Teddy Roosevelt dominates the rolling hills, while in another, grasshoppers five times the size of a car feast on golden wheat rising from scoria rock beds.

[via The Kid Should See This]

The Next Rembrandt

This is fascinating. The Next Rembrandt is a project that deconstructed Rembrandt van Rijn’s paintings and used the data to construct a new painting.

Reminds me of the fascinating documentary: Tim’s Vermeer about Tim Jenison’s attempt(s) to copy a particular Johannes Vermeer painting.

Interesting that both of these guys were Dutch artists and both of them are famous for their depiction of light.

[via Devour]

Edgar Degas monotypes

The Museum of Modern Art has what looks like a fantastic show of Edgar Degas monotypes: Edgar Degas: A Strange New Beauty.

The video above is a terrific overview of both the Degas work and the monotype process.

This looks like a terrific show, I’ll be seeing it for sure.

Lest you think printmaking can’t be part of the photographic process, my good friend Gary Sharp has done a type of mono-printing with Polaroid photography: Polaroid Transfers to watercolor paper.

Onion

This is a Polaroid SX70 photograph of an onion. While the Polaroid film is still wet, the back is peeled off and a piece of watercolor paper is laid on it. A brayer is used (like the press in the video) to apply pressure and the image is transferred (printed) on the paper. This image is a scan of one of those prints.

I’ve always been in awe of Gary’s experiments and as a photographer who makes fine art prints of his work, I’m interested in all aspects of the printing and printmaking process.

Steve McCurry at The Rubin Museum

The photographer Steve McCurry has a show at the Rubin Museum in New York: Steve McCurry, India which I saw when I was in New York last Friday.

If you are anywhere near New York once the snow has cleared and you are remotely interested in photography, India, or a beautifully presented show, see this show. Seeing McCurry’s work printed this large and beautifully presented is breathtaking and his are some of the most iconic and magnificent images of life in India I’ve ever seen.

If you don’t know McCurry’s work, you might be familiar with his most iconic image for National Geographic: Afghan Girl.

I hadn’t been to the Rubin Museum before and I must say, it’s a beautiful place, easy to walk through and the presentation of artwork is excellent.

Rubin Museum of Art
150 West 17th Street
New York, NY 10011

Note: They’re closed Tuesdays.

This show runs from November 18, 2015 – April 4, 2016 so you have time to wait until the snow melts.

I plan to be in New York again this Wednesday and I’ll be going back to this show, it’s that good.

Painting in the Dark

The Long Game Part 3: Painting in the Dark from Delve on Vimeo.

“Painting in the Dark: The Struggle for Art in A World Obsessed with Popularity is the long overdue follow up to the Long Game Parts 1 & 2 which looked at the creative ups and downs of Leonardo da Vinci. In this new video essay, I’ve taken a look at the forgotten difficult years of another celebrated artist and wondered what it means for creative people working today.”

This is a fantastic video essay by Adam Westbrook that uses the life and work of Vincent Van Gogh to illustrate the idea that people who are driven to create, many times do so in obscurity without much recognition to drive them during their lifetimes.

It also illustrates the messiness of a growth process: people aren’t machines, they make good and bad choices in their lives and have ups and downs. No doubt some of our greatest minds (artists, scientists, and others) have never been discovered and their ideas go to the grave with them.

Adam has made other essays leading up to this one that you should have a look at as well. His Vimeo channel is: Delve.

[via Colossal]

Press Pause Play

PressPausePlay from House of Radon on Vimeo.

This was originally posted on my old site in 2012. It’s a terrific piece, well worth taking the time to watch.

The digital revolution of the last decade has unleashed creativity and talent in an unprecedented way, with unlimited opportunities. But does democratized culture mean better art or is true talent instead drowned out? This is the question addressed by PressPausePlay, a documentary film containing interviews with some of the world’s most influential creators of the digital era.

This is an amazing film, really worth making the time (an hour and 21 minutes) to watch. It’s well thought out, well shot, well edited, and the message is nuanced, not a slam dunk for digital or against it.

[via PetaPixel]