Art

Inside Out

French photographer JR who I posted about in 2008 with his Women are Heroes Project has since received a TED Prize and gone on to a new project called “Inside Out” which the video above documents.

I’m curious about the printing process: it’s very fast, low resolution monochrome, and on thin paper. It would be fun to have a printer like that to make wrapping paper.

[via Uncrate]

More containers

Container Experiment

This was originally posted in 2005 on my old site which is no longer public but given my recent posts on climbing, I thought I’d give a bit of context to how climbing leaked out into other parts of my life.

I made these containers 30 years ago during my undergrad days at the University of Oregon Art and Architecture school. They are salt-fired stoneware with a temoku (dark iron) glaze that interacted with the salt.

The experiment was mixing media. I was an art student but also a serious rock climber and loved climbing gear so tried to work my love of perlon rope, knots, and Japanese printed fabric into my pieces as well.

These two were two of hundreds of experiments I did mixing other media into my work and the result was both visually interesting and also functional and useful.

This photo was scanned by Kodak years ago from a slide I took even more years ago so it’s not the best, but it’s all I’ve got because of this pair, only the piece on the left remains.

Containers

This was originally posted in 2004 but given my recent posts on climbing, I thought I’d give a bit of context to how climbing leaked out into other parts of my life.

In the old days, a long time ago (1970-1980) I was a potter and made a living selling wares and teaching ceramics. Most of the photos of my work are in slide form and I have not gotten around to scanning them. Here are a few that I have.

Container, Cork, Perlon, side view

This is a small stoneware “jug” that had a “temoku” glaze on it and was then fired in a wood-fired kiln with salt tossed in (salt fired). At the time I was doing this work I was also getting seriously into rock climbing and I loved all the perlon rope and knots and such. So, I experimented with combining old and new.

Container, Cork, Perlon, top view

This is a top view of a similar piece, different way of securing the cork. The knot on the underside of the lug slides so that the loop on top loosens and tightens to hold the cork in.

Container, Gortex, Perlon

This piece is raku fired: quickly at low temperature. Being the outdoor type I was eating a lot of dried fruit at the time and had built a fruit dryer to make my own. This new material came out called Gortex and so, I bought a piece and put it on a pot, with some fruit inside, thinking that the way it dealt with water would allow the fruit to dry without spoiling (water vapor would go out, but no air would come in). It didn’t’ quite work that way but I liked the colors. This piece also uses a slider knot to tighten and loosen the perlon cord.

Joy Brown off Broadway

Joy Brown On Broadway from Wheelhouse Communications on Vimeo.

From May 2017 through yesterday, February 22, 2018, Joy Brown's
(http://joybrownstudio.com) sculpture exhibition of 9 bronze works has been on display on the Broadway Malls of the Upper West Side up to Washington Heights.

This exhibition was organized with the cooperation of the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation and the Morrison Gallery of Kent, CT in conjunction with the Broadway Mall Association (http://www.broadwaymall.org).

These huge sculptures have been a delight to see during the last three seasons. To call them gigantic is an understatement, but that belies the warmth and tenderness found in them. To see them calmly lording over unruly Broadway pedestrian and automobile traffic, always brought a smile.

Evan Fairbanks took his camera to artfully document them, intrepidly, in rain, snow and occasional sunshine.

Great video.

Here’s my post on the installation of the pieces last May: Joy Brown on Broadway.

Thousand-Pound Bronzes on the Upper West Side

Thousand-Pound Bronzes on the Upper West Side

New Yorker staff writer Paige Williams came to the installation of Joy Brown’s sculpture on Broadway but weren’t sure if the Talk of the Town piece she was working on would make it into the magazine. It did, and hopefully it will bring even more foot traffic to Joy’s amazing work.

I did watch her frantically scribble on her notepad when the driver of the flatbed transporting them down from Bethel, Connecticut said: “I could’ve drove here naked and nobody would’ve noticed.” I thought it might be the lead, I was off by a paragraph.

Joy Brown on Broadway

Figures on a flatbed

Figures on a flatbed

Broadway, New York City.

My good friend Joy Brown has been making large bronze castings of her ceramic sculpture and is having a show of them in New York City. Joy has been traveling to China to work with a foundry there for many years and these finished pieces were shipped to the US in a large container by ship and arrived a few weeks ago. There will be a sister show in China opening in a few months.

Forklift on Broadway

Forklift on Broadway

Thinker in crosswalk

We pulled an all-nighter last night helping with the installation which was done by a great outfit out of Bethel, Connecticut: Mariano Brothers.

We started at 10:00 pm and finished at 3:00 am. There were two flatbed trucks, ours with four pieces starting at 72nd St. and working north, the other starting at 168th St. and working south.

Mother and child at 72nd St.

Mother and child at 72nd St.

Many of Joy’s friends came from all over the country and they were joined by a crowd of curious and supportive New Yorkers. It was quite a scene although after midnight as we moved up town only the core group remained.

Tomorrow, Wednesday May 17th there will be a formal “opening” at 11:00 am at the 72nd St and Broadway installation. The show will be up for at least six months, maybe longer. Each setting has a map showing the location of each of the sculptures. It’s a bit of a hike to walk the whole thing but there’s a subway line running under Broadway and the pieces are near enough to stops so they can be easily gotten to.

I’m pooped!

#joybrownonbroadway

The mathematics of sidewalk illusions

Brilliant, the best explaination of this I’ve ever seen.

“Have you ever come across an oddly stretched image on the sidewalk, only to find that it looks remarkably realistic if you stand in exactly the right spot? These sidewalk illusions employ a technique called anamorphosis — a special case of perspective art where artists represent 3D views on 2D surfaces. So how is it done? Fumiko Futamura traces the history and mathematics of perspective.”

[via The Kid Should See This]

Gary Greff’s large scale sculpture

Incredible work. Incredible story.

“With zero experience welding or creating art, Gary Greff began building the world’s largest metal sculptures and placing them along the “Enchanted Highway,” or Highway 21 in Regent, North Dakota.

By 2006, Greff had completed a total of seven mammoth sculptures for the 32-mile stretch of road. All are thematically related to the western North Dakota’s cultural and historical roots. For instance, in one sculpture Teddy Roosevelt dominates the rolling hills, while in another, grasshoppers five times the size of a car feast on golden wheat rising from scoria rock beds.

[via The Kid Should See This]