Architecture

Wide angle German architecture

Westhafen

My Flickr contact Werner Schwehm took this great wide angle architectural shot in Frankfurt, Germany with a Canon 5D III and a 12-24mm lens at 12mm (very wide angle).

The wide angle gives the image more drama than it would have had otherwise and for those who don’t know, the Canon 5D, being a full-frame camera means that 12mm is actually 12mm instead of 12mm x 1.6 (a cropped APS-C sensor) which would be 19.2mm, still wide but not as wide and dramatic. I miss having a full frame camera and a wide angle lens.

Most point and shoot cameras have smaller sensors which means achieving angles wider than 24mm is near impossible without the addition of some kind of accessory in front of the lens, sort of defeating the portability of the camera.

Even 24mm adds more drama than the 28mm of my Ricoh GR and tempts me to revisit the Sony RX100 series which has a nice zoom lens on it that goes from 24mm at f/1.8 to 70mm at f/2.8. I hate the ergonomics of the Sony (flush mounted controls, terrible menu system) but it’s a fine camera with many excellent features.

For architecture, wide angle, while it adds distortion, also adds drama and I like that.

Cells Interlinked

Cells Interlinked

Flickr member Peter Stewart posted this fantastic image of a wall of apartments in Queenstown, Singapore.

Check out Peter’s Flickr album: Stacked II – Architecture of Singapore. Brilliant work.

The image is great in many ways, one of which is that it is taken at dusk which gives it the same kind of feel as many of the aerial shots of Berlin in the the first few Bourne movies. There’s something about city shots at dusk that creates an ominous mood, something is about to happen…

Shooting up in New York

Afternoon light on monoliths

Afternoon light on monoliths

Between Lexington and Park Avenue on 42nd Street, Manhattan, New York.

We were about to head into Grand Central to get on the train when we noticed that the light on both the Chrysler building and the two buildings across the street was striking. So, out came the cameras, for me for the first time in the day.

Golden hour is aptly named.

Chrysler Building

Chrysler Building

Note: I’ve had it with Adobe going back and forth on Lightroom subscriptions so I’m giving Apple’s Photos a real try. It’s far from perfect but once one spends a bit of time with it and drops the Lightroom comparisons (Lightroom is a much more sophisticated tool) it’s useable and even fun. Time will tell.