Two Nineteen Forty Four

Two Nineteen Forty Four from Tristan Greszko on Vimeo.

Brad Gobright and Jim Reynolds setting a speed record for climbing the Nose route on El Capitan in Yosemite Valley. They climbed it in 2 hours, 19 minutes, and 44 seconds.

To me, speed records seem insane but hey, I’m an old fart who climbed in traditional ways. But, this video is well worth watching because it’s a great piece of work in itself, documenting an amazing achievement.

[via PetaPixel]

Inside Out

French photographer JR who I posted about in 2008 with his Women are Heroes Project has since received a TED Prize and gone on to a new project called “Inside Out” which the video above documents.

I’m curious about the printing process: it’s very fast, low resolution monochrome, and on thin paper. It would be fun to have a printer like that to make wrapping paper.

[via Uncrate]

Wide angle German architecture

Westhafen

My Flickr contact Werner Schwehm took this great wide angle architectural shot in Frankfurt, Germany with a Canon 5D III and a 12-24mm lens at 12mm (very wide angle).

The wide angle gives the image more drama than it would have had otherwise and for those who don’t know, the Canon 5D, being a full-frame camera means that 12mm is actually 12mm instead of 12mm x 1.6 (a cropped APS-C sensor) which would be 19.2mm, still wide but not as wide and dramatic. I miss having a full frame camera and a wide angle lens.

Most point and shoot cameras have smaller sensors which means achieving angles wider than 24mm is near impossible without the addition of some kind of accessory in front of the lens, sort of defeating the portability of the camera.

Even 24mm adds more drama than the 28mm of my Ricoh GR and tempts me to revisit the Sony RX100 series which has a nice zoom lens on it that goes from 24mm at f/1.8 to 70mm at f/2.8. I hate the ergonomics of the Sony (flush mounted controls, terrible menu system) but it’s a fine camera with many excellent features.

For architecture, wide angle, while it adds distortion, also adds drama and I like that.

Reflection

Reflection

On the Appalachian Trail, Gaylordsville, Connecticut.

A few weeks ago we had a day of high winds in western Connecticut and because this area is pretty rocky and trees aren’t deeply rooted, wind can uproot and knock over even very large and old trees.

The section of Appalachian trail between the New York/Connecticut border and Bull’s Bridge is called “Ten Mile Hill” and it’s a very nice four mile hike. The recent wind took down over 20 large trees on this section and we had a big crew of “sawyers” and “swampers” to clean it up. It was a lot of work and I was pretty sore when I got home (nothing beer and ibuprofen won’t fix).

Toward the end of the day I took a few shots of a nice reflection on a small swamp. I was so tired my hands were shaking and I was pretty sure none of the shots would turn out but thankfully a few did.