Great Catskill Hiking on The Devil’s Path

Richard and Gary on Twin, Catskills

Richard and Gary on Twin Mountain, Catskills

Devil’s Path, Catskill Mountains, New York. Gary is visiting again and we decided to do a piece of the Devil’s Path, a hike he’s never done.

Started at Roaring Kill parking area, went up the blue trail to Pecoy Notch, Climbed the west side of Twin Mountain on the Devil’s Path, then went back down to Pecoy Notch and continued on the Devil’s Path up Sugarloaf Mountain and down the other side into Mink Hollow, returning to Roaring Kill on the Mink Hollow blue trail. Great hike, strenuous, steep and rocky but we took our time and had a blast.

Next year we’d love to do the entire eastern section of the Devil’s Path in a day: Indian Head, Twin, Sugarloaf and Plateau. This would be a huge accomplishment for these two old dudes! I’ve done each of these mountains in pairs but never all at once.

On the Devil's Path, Catskills

This is the view behind us which is where we’re about to go: Down Twin to Pecoy Notch (again) and up and over Sugarloaf.

Gary in a chimney on Twin On Sugarloaf Mountain

(Gary took the above picture of me on Sugarloaf).

The great thing about hiking in the Catskills is the shale rock makes for the most interesting formations that trails have to weave in and out of. The Devil’s Path is full of this stuff making what would ordinarily be a strenuous hike up and down a bunch of 1500 foot hills much more interesting.

Gary on the devils path

I have to say, many people think the Catskills aren’t “real” mountains and the park is just full of old, broken down “Borcht Belt” resorts. I’ve hiked and climbed in almost every national park and major mountain range in North America and I have to say the Catskills is one of my favorite places bar none. And, I hiked and climbed in the Sierras, Cascades, and Rockies long before I was introduced to Catskill hiking by my neighbor Dave McCullough. I love the odd shapes of these mountains, the shale rock, and the fact that there’s an extensive and well maintained trail system in the park. We look forward to snowshoeing up these great mountains in winter as well. Frankly, I’m sort of glad that many people go elsewhere to hike and I’ve hiked there without seeing another person all day.

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