Rippled reflection

Rippled reflection

Thayer Brook, Appalachian Trail, Kent, Connecticut.

It was “balmy” out the other day so I took a hike from Rt. 341 south on the AT to Thayer Brook to shoot ice, or, water patterns if there was no ice.

There was no ice but there was enough water to make some nice patterns to shoot.

These are foam ripples in a small pool with a few leaves under water, a twig on the right, and a big rock that forms the right edge of the pool. Oh, and a nice reflection of the oaks on the far side of the brook.

Reflection with rock and leaf

Reflection with rock and leaf

Thayer Brook, Appalachian Trail, Kent, Connecticut.

It was “balmy” out yesterday so I took a hike from Rt. 341 south on the AT to Thayer Brook to shoot ice, or, water patterns if there was no ice.

There was no ice but there was enough water to make some nice patterns to shoot.

I was shooting some foam ripples in a small pool and this rock was near my feet. Between the rock, the leaves, the reflection and the small ripples it seemed like it might make an interesting image.

Small waterfall on Thayer Brook

Small waterfall on Thayer Brook

Thayer Brook, Appalachian Trail, Kent, Connecticut.

It was “balmy” out yesterday so I took a hike from Rt. 341 south on the AT to Thayer Brook to shoot ice, or, water patterns if there was no ice.

There was no ice but there was enough water to make some nice patterns to shoot.

This small waterfall is about a foot high which makes for a nice subject: I can get on top of it and shoot down and the depth of field is shallow enough so things are in focus both on top of the falls and bottom.

I particularly like how the Ricoh GR catches the bubble turbulence below, nice movement detail in all of that chaos.

Mike Nichols, an American Master

Mike Nichols, an American Master

This is a brilliant biographical documentary on the late director Mike Nichols done by his early standup improv partner, Elaine May.

Mike Nichols is best known as both a theater and movie director and he’s directed some incredible movies including: Who’s Afraid of Virginia Wolf (his first film), The Graduate, Silkwood, Heartburn, Biloxi Blues, Working Girl, Postcards from the Edge, Regarding Henry, The Birdcage, Charlie Wilson’s War, and many more.

The American Masters documentary is based in part on an interview Nichols did with the producer Julian Schlossberg where Nichols tells the story of his life. May has taken the interview and added all of the relevant contextual information including interviews with many of the people Nichols knew and worked with, period photographs and video, and much more. It’s an incredible story of an incredible life and even if you’ve never seen his films or plays, my guess is you’ll find it fascinating.

This show aired on PBS in the United States January 30th (last night) and you can watch the entire thing here on the web at the above link. The web video will expire on February 27 so I highly recommend watching it soon. I’m not sure how and where this video will be available in the future.

Here’s a small tidbit on the making of the documentary: Filmmaker Interview with Producer Julian Schlossberg.

Ice in Sage’s Ravine

Ice in Sage's Ravine

We hiked down the south side of Mt. Race on the Appalachian Trail (a section of trail I maintain) into the bottom of Sage’s Ravine which forms the border between Connecticut and Massachusetts.

There was moving water in the ravine but there were calm spots near the shore where ice had formed. Getting to those spots was tough because the trail was iced over and slippery in places but not bad enough for us to have brought micro-spikes along. Getting a few ice pattern shots motivated me to carefully climb down to the edge and hold the camera out with my right hand while holding onto a tree with my left hand.

By the way, one-handed control and shooting is a nice feature of the Ricoh GR; one can do almost everything with the right hand. Holding steady is the biggest challenge. Spray and pray is the way under these conditions.

Ice in Sage's Ravine