The tree of ice

The tree of ice

Appalachian Trail, south end of Schaghticoke Ridge.

Nora and I used micro-spikes to hike three miles up the south end of the ridge to a small stream I’ve photographed ice on before, hoping to get a few ice shots this year. The hike was great although we had to push it because of the incoming snow storm. And, the stream did not disappoint; it was loaded with ice formations which it has taken me a while to sort through.

About Face

About Face

Patricia Marx at has done an incredible piece for The New Yorker on why South Korea is the world’s plastic-surgery capital.

We all want to look our best, but not since seventh grade had I been in the company of people for whom appearance mattered so much. In search of a clearer understanding of why South Koreans are such lookists, I stopped by the book-cluttered office of Eunkook Suh, a psychology professor at Yonsei University, in Seoul. “One factor is that, in contrast to Western cultures, the external aspects of self (your social status, clothes, gestures, and appearance) versus the inner aspects (thoughts and feelings) matter more here,” he explained.

I was in New York yesterday and it was loaded with tourists. As I walked across the Brooklyn Bridge I couldn’t help notice:

1. The number of people taking selfies

2. The number of vendors selling selfie sticks

I guess if you’re going to plaster selfies all over Instagram and Facebook you’d better have plastic-surgery first.

Ice patterns

Ice patterns

Appalachian Trail, south end of Schaghticoke Ridge.

Nora and I used micro-spikes to hike three miles up the south end of the ridge to a small stream I’ve photographed ice on before, hoping to get a few ice shots this year. The hike was great although we had to push it because of the incoming snow storm. And, the stream did not disappoint; it was loaded with ice formations which it has taken me a while to sort through.

Firefly Cage

Hotaru kago (LOC)

Firefly cage

This is a traditional Japanese woodblock print by Shōkoku Yamamoto done between 1900 and 1910.

My flickr contact The Library of Congress has a nice collection of them: Japanese Prints: Seasons & Places.

Incredible work.

More on Woodblock printing in Japan.

Consider how multiple colors are done, how registration is kept tight and all of this with more primitive tools than we have today.

Floating sidewalk

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My flickr contact Ming Thein took this in Hong Kong. It’s looking up at a mirrored ceiling and the image is flipped over. Sort of hurts one’s brain to think about it too much but it’s a great reflection.

I found it as part of a post he recently did on illusion and reality at his web site.